MAPS (Mid America Paleontology Society), Sponsor of National Fossil Exposition

Past Years' News Archives


News Summaries From Earlier Years
Past News/Events from earlier in 2015-16



EXPO 2016 Programs Schedule Released!


Contact: Tom Williams, Mid-America Paleontology Society - (815) 223-9638; Paleotom234@comcast.net

EVENT: Mid-America Paleontology Society (MAPS) 38th Annual Fossil Expo - the largest fossil-only show in the world. Dealers/Exhibitors from across the U.S & beyond.

DATES: April 1 - 3, 2016.

PLACE: MAPS EXPO takes place at Sharpless Auction Building, Exit 249, I-80, East of Iowa City, Iowa

TIME: Show: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Sunday (limited dealers on Sunday)

ADMISSION: The show and all events are free and open to the public, however donations are accepted. Children must be supervised.

PROGRAMS:


At Clarion Hotel Ball Room:

Friday, April 1, Keynote Address by Phil Currie of the University of Alberta


6:00 p.m. 'The Dinosaurs of Alberta - old history and new discoveries'


In 1910, Barnum Brown of the American Museum of Natural History (New York) triggered 'The Great Canadian Dinosaur Rush', which lasted until the mid-1920s. By the time the dust had settled, hundreds of original Alberta dinosaur skeletons were on display or in the collections of more than 35 institutions around the world. Following the Depression, however, funding for collecting dinosaurs (and for doing research on the specimens already collected) largely disappeared. Research programs in Alberta remained low key through the Second World War and into the 1950s. The establishment in 1955 of the 'Drumheller and District Dinosaur Museum' and Dinosaur Provincial Park planted the seeds of change. More than a decade passed, but Canada's centennial in 1967 was the dawn of a new age. Ground-breaking research on Alberta's dinosaurs by Bakker, Dodson, Farlow, Russell, and others helped to trigger the 'Dinosaur Renaissance' that was in full swing by the 1970s. By now, research on dinosaurs focused on aspects of dinosaurian biology and their reproduction, behavior, physiology and relationships. The UNESCO designation of Dinosaur Provincial Park as a UNESCO World Heritage Site (1979) and the opening of the Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in 1985 kept Alberta near the centre of international interest in dinosaurs. That interest continued to snowball up to the release of the movie 'Jurassic Park' in 1993. Although public interest seemed to peak at that time, research interest continued to surge ahead, gathering momentum. Ironically, Hollywood had educated the public and subtly altered the direction of dinosaur research. Although it is unlikely that dinosaurs will ever be cloned or brought back to life, computer modeling has muscled and fleshed out many dinosaur species, bringing them to life at least in our minds.
We are in a new golden age of dinosaur research, and the opening of a new dinosaur museum in the Grande Prairie region marks just one more step in the evolution of the field. Never before have there been so many palaeontologists working on these animals. New discoveries of exciting specimens are being made at an unprecedented rate all over the World. But the research focus has changed. It is now more international and multidisciplinary, the questions being asked are more specific, and computers have become as important as geological hammers. Even though Alberta has been more intensively searched for dinosaurs than most places, and even though the focus of most research publications has changed, new dinosaurs continue to be recovered. In the last few years, more than half a dozen new species of dinosaurs from Alberta have been described and named. But one does not need to find a new species to make a significant discovery, and two of the most spectacular finds in recent years were representatives of two well-known dinosaurs from Dinosaur Provincial Park. In 2010, a University of Alberta field crew recovered a nearly complete skeleton of a baby Chasmosaurus belli. Articulated skeletons of juvenile or small dinosaurs have always been rare, and this specimen represents the smallest skeleton recovered anywhere of a ceratopsid (horned) dinosaur. Although the end of the tail was lost to erosion, a skeleton of Saurornitholestes recovered in 2014 is otherwise complete, and provides new information on the origin of birds from Velociraptor-like dinosaurs of North America.

INFO ON PHIL CURRIE
Phil helped found the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in Drumheller, Alberta and is now a professor at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. In the 1980s he became the director of the Canada-China Dinosaur Project, the first cooperative palaeontological partnering between China and the West since the Central Asiatic Expeditions in the 1920s, and helped describe some of the first feathered dinosaurs. He is one of the primary editors of the influential Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs,[and his areas of expertise include theropods (especially Tyrannosauridae), the origin of birds, and dinosaurian migration patterns and herding behavior. He was one of the models for palaeontologist Alan Grant in the film Jurassic Park.


At the University of Iowa , Trowbridge Hall Room 125

Friday, April 1, U of I Friday seminar by Eva Koppelhaus, University of Alberta:

4:00 pm 'Paleoflora and Paleoenvironments of the Campanian in Alberta, Canada Cretaceous Park, the ancient Paleo Environment of Dinosaur Provincial Park:


Many researchers with interest in Paleobotany and Palynology have over the last century searched for and studied plant fossils that have been found in the Dinosaur Park Formation and the Horseshoe Canyon Formation. These two formations span the Campanian and Maastrichtion (76.5 to 67 my) of Alberta, it turns out that well-preserved palynomorphs (spores and pollen and other organic-walled microfossils) are common in the sediments from Dinosaur Park Formation. It has been possible to identify 500 different species, the affinities of which belong to mosses, lycopods, horsetails, tree-ferns, conifers, and flowering plants. In a few cases, it has been possible to relate the specimens to known plants. However there is a high degree of uncertainty with respect to these relationships in most palynomorphs. Macro plant fossils are not common in the Dinosaur Park Formation, although they have been collected over the last 150 years. Macro plant fossils are mostly found as compressions or impressions. At some sites, they are found as molds or casts in ironstone. Only about twenty different kinds of macro plant fossils have been identified, as the environment seems to have favoured the preservation of palynomorphs rather than leaves


At Sharpless Auctions Facility:


Friday, April 1 - Afternoon programs:
12:45 p.m. Tom Williams: Receptaculites


The Ordovician period was from 489 - 443 million years ago which saw the appearance of a mystery fossil. Receptaculitids, a forgotten reef building organism, was once called a sunflower coral. But it is definitely not a coral - so what is it? This program will address the mystery fossils similarities and differences to other fossils. The question of true classification as well as its occurrence in the fossil record will be discussed of these very different but prized fossils.

INFO ON TOM WILLIAMS
Tom is a geology graduate of Western Illinois University and later received a Master of Science in Geohydrology at Illinois State. He has worked for 30 plus years as a geologist for Soil Testing Services Consultants, Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and as a part time instructor at Illinois State in Geologic Environmental Classes. He has contributed articles to several MAPS digests and is currently Show Chairman for EXPO. He has specialised mostly in collecting Crinoids in the Mississippian Chesterian age since 1980, contributing knowledge and some important specimens while collecting with other researchers. In 1998 he worked with Dennis Burdick on a major crinoid dig in the Chesterian of Alabama which uncovered many important specimens including whole plates up to five ft by five feet with some specimens having stems five to six feet long. A fossil trip with Paleoprospectors resulted in finding a thirty foot Tylosaur poriger in the Kansas chalk of Nebraska and a second trip two years ago yielded a Cretaceous fossil flowering plant that may be used for research. Paleotom234@comcast.net


2:00p.m. John Catalani: 'Archaeopteryx and Friends or, How Dinosaurs Learned to Fly.'


This program will examine the adaptations of Archaeopteryx used in determining whether or not Archaeopteryx could fly. Some of this evidence comes from newly discovered specimens and some from a re-examination of known specimens. Along with the adaptations of the many other species of "feathered dinosaurs" and early birds, some older than Archaeopteryx, we will try to determine just how dinosaurs learned to fly and evolve into true birds and which adaptations were essential in developing the ability to fly.

INFO ON JOHN CATALANI
John taught high school Earth Science for 32 years before retiring in 2004. From 1995 until it ceased publication in 2011, he authored the 'An Amateur's Perspective' column for the newsletter magazine of the Paleontological Research Institution, American Paleontologist. John has several publications including one on Upper Mississippi Valley nautiloids and several with Robert Frey on Platteville Group Nautiloids. He has also presented many programs to clubs and at PaleoFest at the Burpee Museum in 2010. fossilnautiloid@aol.com;


Saturday, April 2:

9:30 a.m. John Moffitt: 'Devonian Trilobites from Morocco'

Let's take a visual tour around the extraordinary variety of trilobites currently being extracted from the best Middle Devonian stratigraphic sequence on the planet Earth. This rich Middle Devonian marine environment was on the western shelf of a large continent. Our window into this world lasts from anout 400 million years ago up to 385 million years ago. John Moffit will share over 40 years of experiences collecting trilobites in the Anti-Atlas Mountains of Morocco and Algeria. Great stories and stunning photographs - this promises to be a wild ride through some amazing fossils

INFO ON JOHN MOFFITT
John is a Theoretical Astrophysicist by education and an Earth Scientist for most of his career, working in the oil business for over 40 years' He's been a geologist, geophysicist, paleontologist, petrophysicist, and exploration manager -- and currently manages engineering projects. A volunteer at the Houston Museum of Natural Science since the mid 70's, John helped to curate a special exhibit of his own collection at the museum called "Ancient Creatures & Ancient Seas". A past member of the AAPG, SEG, SEPM, Houston Geological Society, and past president of the Houston Gem and Mineral Society, he leads paleontolgical field trips around the world. For over 30 years, he continues to take a group of fourth graders on a paleontological field trip across time and across Texas each year in the spring. A past International Director for the Toastmasters always looking for his next challenge, John speaks at universities, museums, and organizations on everything from astrophysics to a new field of paleo-geography. He speaks on the oil business, offshore drilling, hydraulic fracturing, peak oil, galactic physics, the meaning of life, paleontology, geology, and on various groups of extinct animals. In addition, he lectures, cartoons, and writes frequently in the sciences. In 2002, John was inducted in to the Paleontology Hall of Fame for his paleontological expertise, his writings and for his work with Earth Science education. jmoffitt.hou@gmail.com 713-478-4555;


10:45 a.m. . Charles Newsom: 'Stump The Experts- Bring your fossils to ID'

If I can't identify it, I will find someone who can. I will also give general tips in Iding your material.

INFO ON CHARLES NEWSOM
Charles is an Emeritus Faculty in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Iowa. He is also a Research Fellow with the Non-Vertebrate Paleontology Laboratory of the Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas, an avid fossil collector and is currently living in central Texas. He is board member of the Miller Springs Alliance, a non-profit organization which administers the Miller Springs Nature Center and is also collaborating with several paleontologists on a number of paleontological studies. Charles-newsom@uiowa.edu


12:45 p.m. Don Johnson: 'Dinosaurs Growing Up!'

Recent research has shed light on the growth and development of many kinds of dinosaurs. What do we know about parental care of hatchling dinosaurs? How fast did dinosaurs grow? When did they reach full size and how long did they live? Did herbivores grow faster than the predators that fed upon them? If so, why? This program will focus on answering these questions with a focus on duck-billed dinosaurs, tyrannosaurs, oviraptorosaurs and sauropods. See and touch genuine fossil dinosaur bones, teeth, and claws. Examine fossil bones of a special duckbill, 'Laura the Kid Dinosaur', and see how she fits on the Hypacrosaurus growth curve (visit www.paleoproject.org to learn more). See and touch fossil dinosaur eggs, replica T. rex jaws, replica Apatosaurus femur, and more! Learn about the tremendous teenage growth spurt of Tyrannosaurus rex. Don will share his experiences hunting for dinosaur fossils in the badlands of South Dakota & Montana to conclude the program.

INFO ON DON JOHNSON
Don is an amateur paleontologist from Iowa City, IA with a special interest in fossil vertebrates. His collection of fossils and fossil replicas is one of the largest in Iowa, and he has experience collecting fossils in Iowa and other states out West. Using his self-given nickname 'The Fossil Guy,' he has taught hundreds of educational programs using items from his collection. Don is President of the Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project (EIPP) - a non-profit with the purpose of establishing exhibits and promoting science education through the wonder of paleontology. He can be contacted at 319-213-1390 or donjohnson0511@gmail.com. To learn more about the EIPP, visit www.paleoproject.org.


2:00 p.m. Tiffany Adrain: 'Investigating the historic collections of America's famous fossil hunter, Charles H. Sternberg, at the University of Iowa.'

Charles H. Sternberg was head of a fossil collecting dynasty that, along with sons George, Charles and Levi, was famous for collecting the 'Trachodon mummy', and the iconic 'fish within a fish.' C. H. Sternberg collected fossils for Edward Drinker Cope early in the infamous 'Bone Wars.' At the University of Iowa, we know C. H. Sternberg as the collector of one of our largest and most impressive specimens, the Kansas Mosasaur, and the collector, preparator and identifier of our large collection of Cretaceous leaf fossils. Find out more about this world-renowned fossil collector and his legacy as we follow the investigations of our undergraduate students into the history of the UI collections.

INFO ON TIFFANY ADRAIN
Tiffany is the Collections Manager at the University of Iowa Paleontology Repository in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences. tiffany-adrain@uiowa.edu 319-335-1822


3:15 p.m. Craig Sundell - 'Digging Jurassic Sauropods in NE Wyoming: Pictures from the Field.'


INFO ON CRAIG SUNDELL
Craig has collected the central Wyoming Oligocene White River Fm. since 1978. He received a BS in Zoology and Geology from the University of Wyoming in 1994 and MS from Kansas University in 2002 in the Paleoecology and Mammal Burrowing Community of the Oligocene White River Fm. of Central Wyoming. From 1997-2003 he discovered or supervised the collection of 4 Camarasaurus and a nearly complete articulated Brachiosaurus from the Jurassic Morrison Fm. In 1999 and 2000 he collected a T. rex and several Triceratops from the Cretaceous Lance Fm. in WY. From 2006-8 he worked in west central Peru on Miocene marine fauna. In 2008 he formed the non-profit Santayana Institute to promote academic and K-12 education in the Earth Sciences. He is currently a Director of the Santayana Institute as a Paleontologist/Logician. He also serves as head Paleontologist for the private enterprise Midwest Paleo, which sells and distributes fossil casts and specimens for public and private collections. He is currently collecting Pennslyvanian period flora, trackways and insects in eastern Kansas. cjsund@swbell.net


At Sharpless Auctions Facility
LIVE AUCTION:
5:15 p.m. Saturday, April 2.
Approximately 80 fossils and fossil-related items will be auctioned. Special Auction Item: Dinosaur Dig Trip, offered by Paleo Prospectors, to South Dakota, Wyoming or North Dakota for the summer of 2016. Minimum bid has yet to be determined Keep almost everything you find (up to $4000). Pick from three week-long sessions in June or July. More information on the trip can be found at http://www.paleoprospectors.com. Proxy bids may be emailed to EXPO chair Tom Williams: paleotom234@comcast.net.
Proceeds from the auction are used to support paleontology scholarships.




Sunday, April 3:

1:00 p.m. Bill Desmarais: 'Dinosaur Provincial Park: A Dig Into Awesome'

Dinosaur Provincial Park in the Canadian province of Alberta is a United Nations 'World Heritage Site'. Even that designation does not do justice to the amazing dinosaur resources found there. After more than two weeks working in it's quarries I am still awestruck by the diversity and abundance in the dinosaur fauna. Come with me as we explore a fantastic assemblage of fossils and more in the world's hotbed of dinosaurs.

INFO ON BILL DESMARAIS
Bill was a high school science teacher in Iowa for 36 years before his retirement in 2007. He taught biology, earth sciences, and Advanced Placement Environmental Science at Washington High School in Cedar Rapids. Since 1982 he has had the good fortune to work with Dr. Phil Currie of the University of Alberta at Edmonton and Pete Larson of the Black Hills Institute, Hill City, South Dakota at several dinosaur quarries in South Dakota, Wyoming and several locations in Alberta, Canada. Bill is a member of the Iowa Academy of Science and the Cedar Valley Rock and Minerals Society, as well as the Mid-America Paleontological Society. Desmarais_3@msn.com



OTHER ACTIVITIES:

Silent Auctions Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
Children's Fossil Dig Box.

MAPS is a non-profit organization of amateurs and professionals from across the U.S. and several other countries whose love of fossils brings them together. The purposes of the organization are to promote popular interest in the subject of paleontology and to encourage the proper collecting, studying, and preparation and displaying of fossils, and to assist other individuals, groups, and institutions interested in the various aspects of paleontology. For more information about the EXPO or our club please visit our web site at www.midamericapaleo.org.

Next MAPS Meeting



Saturday, February 13th, 2016 - 1:00 PM

In 115 Trowbridge Hall on the
University of Iowa Campus.

Program by Paul Liu
An Update on the Winneshiek Lagerstatte


Paul Liu is affiliated with the Iowa Geological Survey, IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering, University of Iowa

For a sample of some of the work taking place on the Winneshiek Lagerstatte, have a look at:
'The oldest described eurypterid: a giant Middle Ordovician (Darriwilian) megalograptid from the Winneshiek Lagerstatte of Iowa'
by James C. Lamsdell, Derek E. G. Briggs, Huaibao P. Liu, Brian J. Witzke and Robert M. McKay



Location change for MAPS Meeting

November 14th, 2015


Meet for lunch at noon at the Ronneberg Restaurant, Amana, IA

The Ronneberg is at 4408 220th Trail, Amana, IA.

The business meeting will commence at 1 PM

The program will start at 2 pm, by Ithiel Catiri

on the discovery and restoration of their own dinosaur.

The program will include a tour of

Edelstein Treasures Gems/Stones/Gifts/Bones in Amana, IA.

Edelstein Treasures is at 4510 220th Trail Amana, Iowa 52203 -

Phone (319) 622-3018


MAPS-CVRMS Fall 2015 Field Trip, Sunday

October 11th, 2015


Joint fall field trip with the Cedar Valley Rocks & Minerals Society

at River Products Inc Klein Quarry, Coralville, IA


A limit to the number of participants on the field trip has been imposed - YOU MUST RSVP TO BE ABLE TO GO ON THIS TRIP!!

Contact Marv Houg via e-mail to reserve your spot:
m_houg@yahoo.com

Klein Quarry, Coralville, IA - 8:45AM sharp.

Meet at the main entrance to Klein at 8:45 to sign in and get safety instructions.
Enter the quarry at 9:00.
This is a lock-in quarry; that is, the gate is locked behind us and no one can enter or leave (except in an emergency) until noon, when a group will be let out. Others can come in at that time if they are waiting at the gate.
The rest of the group will leave at about 4:00.
This is a 'hard-rock' working quarry.
Requirements are that you must be a member of the Cedar Valley Rock and Mineral Society or MAPS and sign a waiver.
Also we are going to be enforcing strict safety requirements such as everyone must have a hard hat on, a bright safety vest, and hard shoes (steel toed is preferred). No open toed sandals or tennis shoes will be allowed. Also long pants will be required, no shorts will be allowed. Some type of safety glasses and gloves are encouraged.

All children should be closely supervised.
Possible finds include: millerite, coral heads, horn corals, brachiopods, bryozoans, trilobites, crinoids and maybe cephalopods, fish parts, and blastoids. Useful tools include: rock hammers, cold chisels, sledges and pry bars.
Bring your own water and lunch.
You MUST be a member of CVRMS or MAPS to attend this field trip but you can join at the gate. To save time, download and fill out the club liability waiver at www.cedarvalleyrockclub.org
Safety first! Please stay at least as far away from highwalls/ledges by as many feet as the wall or dropoff is high - that is, 25 feet away (minimum) from a 25 foot highwall or 25 foot dropoff.
To get to Klein, take Hwy 6 (Coralville Strip/2nd Street) west of Coralville towards Tiffin to Deer Creek Road.
If you go under the Interstate, you have gone too far.
Take Deer Creek Road (340th Street) to the south past the intersection with 340th Street and continue south then follow the signs.

Expo 2015

Sharpless Auctions Facility, Iowa City, IA



EXPO 2015 Schedule of Events



The MAPS EXPO Show will be held April 10-12, 2015, at the Sharpless Auction facility just north of I-80 at Exit 249. The Pre-Show is scheduled to occupy the Travelodge south of I-80 at Exit 246 on North Dodge Street about 3 mi from Sharpless Auctions. Both venues are located in Iowa City, Iowa.


EVENT: Mid-America Paleontology Society (MAPS) 37th Annual Fossil Expo - the largest fossil-only show in the world. Dealers/Exhibitors from across the U.S & beyond.

DATES: April 10-12, 2015.

PLACE: All events take place at Sharpless Auction Building, Exit 249, I-80, East of Iowa City, Iowa.

TIME: Friday and Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday (limited dealers on Sunday) 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

ADMISSION: The show and all events are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, goodwill donations are accepted. Children must be supervised.

SPECIAL EXHIBITS: Laura the Kid Dinosaur, presented courtesy of Don Johnson and the Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project(EIPP).

EXPO 2015 DAILY SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

at Sharpless Auctions Facility, Iowa City, IA


Friday, April 10, 2015 -

Show sales hours 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Silent Auctions throughout the day
Children's Fossil Dig Pit

Workshop Talks:
  • 12:45PM Sheri Ellis/ Ronny Leder/Sean Moran- The FOSSIL Project: 'Unveiling myFOSSIL!'
    • The goal of the FOSSIL Project is to cultivate a networked community in which amateur and professional paleontologists collaborate in learning, the practice of science, and outreach.
    • FOSSIL will build upon ongoing national 'big data' initiatives that over the next decade will make millions of digitized (imaged) fossil specimens available to diverse stakeholders, including fossil clubs and amateur paleontologists.
    • Central to the effort is the just launched myFOSSIL website which provides opportunities for all fossil enthusiasts to upload images of fossils and learn from others in the broader community.


  • 2:00PM Tom Williams: 'Cystoids'

  • 3:15PM John Catalani: 'Mississippian Cephalopods'
    • After some background on nautiloids and ammonoids, the distribution and evolution of Mississippian (Lower Carboniferous) cephalopods will be presented.
    • Evolutionary trends in Mississippian ammonoids will show how they relate to ancestral groups from the Devonian and subsequent Mesozoic groups.
    • Two faunas, the Coral Ridge in Kentucky and the Caney Shale in Oklahoma, will be used to illustrate the evolution of cephalopods from early to late Mississippian.


    KEYNOTE ADDRESS
    5:15PM - BY LANCE GRANDE OF THE CHICAGO FIELD MUSEUM




    Saturday, April 11, 2015 -

    Show sales hours 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    Silent Auctions throughout the day
    Children's Fossil Dig Pit

    Workshop Talks:
    • 9:30AM John Moffitt: 'The Holocene Extinction Event'
      • Look at the very big picture for what humans are currently doing to Earth and its biosphere.
      • Earth's past is already filled with a complex history of extinction events… how do they compare with today?
      • A lot of living things are currently going extinct and humans are clearly at the heart of it.
      • Geologist, paleontologist, and astrophysicist John Moffit will fill you in on a laundry list of extinction activities currently taking place on Earth, just how dangerous a time we all live in, and what you need to be doing about it.
      • His first and very important bit of advice is to educate yourself and THINK!


    • 10:45AM Sheri Ellis/ Ronny Leder/Sean Moran- The FOSSIL Project: 'Unveiling myFOSSIL!'
      • The goal of the FOSSIL Project is to cultivate a networked community in which amateur and professional paleontologists collaborate in learning, the practice of science, and outreach.
      • FOSSIL will build upon ongoing national 'big data' initiatives that over the next decade will make millions of digitized (imaged) fossil specimens available to diverse stakeholders, including fossil clubs and amateur paleontologists.
      • Central to the effort is the just launched myFOSSIL website which provides opportunities for all fossil enthusiasts to upload images of fossils and learn from others in the broader community.


    • 12:45PM Don Johnson: 'The World of Laura the Kid Dinosaur'
      • See and touch fossil bones of 'Laura the Kid Dinosaur' and learn about the world in which she lived! Laura was a young Hypacrosaurus, a type of crested duck-billed dinosaur that lived 75 million years ago in Montana.
      • Learn about what makes Hypacrosaurus special including how it chewed its food, how it grew, and how it cared for its young. Fossils, replicas and models of duckbills and other types of dinosaurs that lived with Laura including tyrannosaurs, horn-faced dinosaurs, raptor dinosaurs, armored dinosaurs, and oviraporosaurs will be on display.
      • What other types of reptiles, mammals, amphibians, fish, invertebrates, and plants shared Laura’s ecosystem?
      • You will be able to explore many fossils of these other plants and animals as well.
      • See the realistic 1:4 scale reconstruction of Laura by paleosculptor Roby Braun, and learn more about the efforts of the Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project to establish a dinosaur exhibit featuring Laura.


    • 2:00PM Paul Meyer: 'Niagaran' fossils and the Silurian reef digitization project at the Field Museum
      • A tropical sea covered the Great Lakes region 430 million years ago.
      • The richest biodiversity communities the world had seen up until this time thrived around stromatoporoid and tabulate coral built reefs measuring 100 meters tall.
      • The reefs were buried as environmental conditions changed, preserving hundreds of different species.
      • Many Silurian fossils were collected as the Chicago Drainage Canal, was built in the 1890’s.
      • The fossils were cataloged, given a number and label, and have been part of the Field Museum’s collection for over 120 years resulting in over 300 scientific publications.
      • The specimens are now being digitized as part of a 3 year long IMLS funded Silurian Reef Digitization Project.
      • Digitizing the specimens will allow researchers to study these fossils in new ways and also make the data available to teachers, students, and the general public.


    • 3:15PM Charles Newsom: 'Stump the Experts- Bring your fossils to ID'
      If I can't identify it, I will find someone who can! I will also give general tips in IDing your material.

    LIVE AUCTION:
    5:15PM Saturday, April 11

    Approximately 80 fossils and fossil-related items will be auctioned!

      Special Auction Item: Dinosaur Dig Trip, offered by Paleo Prospectors, to South Dakota, Wyoming or North Dakota for the summer of 2015.
    • Minimum bid has yet to be determined.
    • Keep almost everything you find (up to $4000).
    • Pick from three week-long sessions in June or July.
    • More information on the trip can be found at http://www.paleoprospectors.com.
    • Proxy bids may be emailed to EXPO chair Tom Williams: paleotom234@comcast.net.


    Proceeds from the auction are used to support paleontology scholarships.
    In preceding years, EXPO auctions have funded scholarships at the University of Iowa, The Paleontologic Research Institution, and the Paleontological Society.

    Sunday, April 12, 2015 -

    Show sales hours 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM (Limited Dealers)

    Silent Auctions throughout the day
    Children's Fossil Dig Pit

    Workshop Talks:

    • 12:00PM Tiffany Adrain: 'Preserving 500-million-years-worth of plant life on Earth: revitalization of the UI Paleontology Repository's Fossil Plant Collection'
      • Looking after fossils has many challenges, even if they are mostly rocks!
      • Pests and high humidity were threatening the UI fossil plant collection physically, and a lack of permanent documentation meant that the collection was in danger of losing its scientific value.
      • Thanks to a $196k grant from the National Science Foundation, the future of the fossil plant collection looks much brighter.
      • Hear all about the latest project to rehouse the specimens, how we plan to care for the fossils and their data, and discover some of the history behind this amazing collection.


    • 1:00PM Bill Desmarais: 'Jurassic Jumble: Waugh Quarry, Wyoming'
      • The Jurassic Period sported some of the largest of all dinosaurs.
      • Many times when they died their skeletons were taken apart by the forces of nature, like a flowing stream, and jumbled together for modern day paleontologists to discover.
      • The Waugh Quarry, near Hulett, Wyoming, is such a place.
      • This workshop will demonstrate field techniques used to find, remove, and document dinosaur remains from this Jurassic quarry.
      • Participants will also be able to do hands-on activities that simulate the work done in dinosaur quarries.
      • This workshop is appropriate for any age.




      EXPO 2015 Speaker Bios:


      LANCE GRANDE
      • Lance has been a curator in the Geology Department of Field Museum for over 21 years.
      • Over the last 25 years he has had regular active field programs in Wyoming and in southern Mexico.
      • His Wyoming site, part of the famous Green River Formation, is one of the world's most productive fossil localities, and Dr. Grande is one of the world's leading authorities on the paleontology of that region.
      • His collecting activities and collaborations with other museums around the world have helped make the Field Museum’s fossil fish collection one of the two largest in North America, and one of the four largest in the World.

      PAUL MAYER
      • Paul has been the Fossil Invertebrate collections manager at the Field Museum for the past seven years.
      • He worked ten years at the Milwaukee Public Museum and as part of the geologists in the parks program he worked for two years on the Yavapai Point Trailside Museum at the Grand Canyon.

      JOHN MOFFITT
      • John is both an Astrophysicist and Earth Scientist, working in the oil business for 50 years.
      • He's been a geologist, geophysicist, paleontologist and exploration manager.
      • A trilobite collector, he’s been a member of MAPS for 40 years, and has articles in both all-trilobite special issues.
      • He's found in Tucson every year for 35 years and is a veteran of all Trilobite Jams.
      • John is a past president of the Houston Gem and Mineral Society, a past Federation vice-president and leads paleontological field trips around the world.
      • A past director for Toastmasters, he lectures, cartoons and writes frequently in the Earth Sciences, and was inducted into the National Rockhound &
      • Lapidary Hall of Fame in 2002 for his work in paleontology and with children on Earth Science education.
      • jmoffitt.hou@gmail.com 713-478-4555;

      TIFFANY ADRAIN
      • Tiffany is Collections Manager at the University of Iowa Paleontology Repository, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences.
      • She has worked with museum fossil collections for 26 years, is an instructor for the UI Museum Studies Certificate Program, and is the Membership
      • Committee Chair for the Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections.
      • tiffany-adrain@uiowa.edu 319-335-1822

      CHARLES NEWSOM
      • Charles is an Emeritus Faculty in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Iowa.
      • He is also a Research Fellow with the Texas Memorial Museum, an avid fossil collector and is currently living in central Texas.
      • He is board member of the Miller Springs Alliance, a non-profit organization which administers the Miller Springs Nature Center and is also collaborating with several paleontologists on a number of paleontological studies.
      • Charles-newsom@uiowa.edu

      DON JOHNSON
      • Don is an amateur paleontologist from Iowa City, IA with a special interest in fossil vertebrates.
      • His collection of fossils and fossil replicas is one of the largest in Iowa, and he has experience collecting fossils in Iowa and other states out West.
      • Using his self-given nickname "The Fossil Guy," he has taught hundreds of educational programs using items from his collection.
      • Don is President of the Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project (EIPP) – a non-profit with the purpose of establishing exhibits and promoting science education through the wonder of paleontology. He can be contacted at 319-213-1390 or donjohnson0511@gmail.com.
      • To learn more about the EIPP, visit www.paleoproject.org.

      JOHN CATALANI
      • John taught high school Earth Science for 32 years before retiring in 2004.
      • From 1995 until it ceased publication in 2011, he authored the “An Amateur’s Perspective” column for the newsletter magazine of the Paleontological
      • Research Institution, American Paleontologist.
      • John has several publications including one on Upper Mississippi Valley nautiloids and several with Robert Frey on Platteville Group Nautiloids.
      • He has also presented many programs to clubs and at PaleoFest at the Burpee Museum in 2010.
      • fossilnautiloid@aol.com;

      TOM WILLIAMS
      • Tom is a geology graduate of Western Illinois University and later received a Master of Science in Geohydrology at Illinois State.
      • He has worked for 30 plus years as a geologist for Soil Testing Services Consultants, Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and as a part time instructor at Illinois State in Geologic Environmental Classes.
      • He has contributed articles to several MAPS digests and is currently Show Chairman for EXPO.
      • He has specialised mostly in collecting Crinoids in the Mississippian Chesterian age since 1980, contributing knowledge and some important specimens while collecting with other researchers.
      • In 1998 he worked with Dennis Burdick on a major crinoid dig in the Chesterian of Alabama which uncovered many important specimens including whole plates up to five ft by five feet with some specimens having stems five to six feet long.
      • A fossil trip with Paleoprospectors resulted in finding a thirty foot Tylosaur poriger in the Kansas chalk of Nebraska and a second trip two years ago yielded a Cretaceous fossil flowering plant that may be used for research.
      • Paleotom234@comcast.net

      SHARI ELLIS, PHD
      • Co-PI on the FOSSIL Project based at the Florida Museum of Natural History.
      • Trained as a learning scientist, Shari is also the project evaluator for iDigBio the coordinating center for the effort to digitize all biological collections in the U.S.

      RONNY LEDER, PHD
      • Ronny is a post-doctoral fellow at FLMNH andiDigBio.
      • Ronny has many years of experience working with the amateur paleo community and is an expert in high resolution imaging of fossils.

      SEAN MORAN, MS
      • M.S. Geology with a concentration in Paleontology, has extensive experience photographing fossils for museum collections.
      • He is currently involved in developing fossil-based curriculum for K12 education.

      BILL DESMARAIS
      • Bill was a high school science teacher in Iowa for 36 years before his retirement in 2007.
      • He taught biology, earth sciences, and Advanced Placement Environmental Science at Washington High School in Cedar Rapids.
      • Since 1982 he has had the good fortune to work with Dr. Philip Currie of the University of Alberta at Edmonton and Pete and Neal Larson of the
      • Black Hills Institute at several dinosaur quarries in South Dakota, Wyoming and several locations in Alberta, Canada.
      • The adventure and thrill of discovering dinosaur remains is what drives him to hunt the 'terrible lizards'.
      • Bill is a fellow in the Iowa Academy of Science and a member of the Cedar Valley Rock and Minerals Society and the Mid-America Paleontological Society.
      • Desmarais_3@msn.com

      Regular Club Meeting Saturday January 10th, 2015



           The January MAPS (Mid-America Paleontology Society) meeting will be held in Room 208 of Norton Hall at the Cornell College on January 10 at 1:00 p.m. Cornell professor Ben Greenstein will present his program:
      'Coral Reef Growth During Sea Level Rise: Lessons from the Pleistocene'


      The regular MAPS business meeting will follow at 2:00 p.m.


      May-Aug 2014 Newsletter available



           
      Click on the link below - no password required!

      MAPS Digest Newsletter - May-Aug 2014







      Calendar of Upcoming Events
      Late Summer & Fall 2014



      July-August 2014:

      From the
      ESCONI website:

      July 31 - August 4
      Multi-Federation Field Trip - Terry, Montana
      Multi-Federation field trip gathering in the town of Terry in eastern Montana. Numerous trips to Gravel Bars on the Yellowstone River to hunt for Montana agates, jasper, petrified wood, fossil coral, stromatolites, and more. There also will be trips to fossil country to the Pierre and Bear Paw formations areas to collect ammonites, baculites, scaphites, nautiloids, and many other shells, 70-95 million years old. In the works are trips to areas to collect dinosaur fossils from the Hell Creek formation. More information to come on this. Plus, there will be the opportunity to take a guided tour through the Eastern Montana Badlands. Kids are welcome.
      Location: In and around Terry, Montana Info: Contact Doug True, AFMS Field Trip Chair dtruefossils12@yahoo.com or 406-670-0506.

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


      Saturday, August 9th, NOON to 4PM:
      Fertile (IA) Quarry Public Program Event
      Hosted by BMC Materials Corp and the Black Hawk Gem & Mineral Society
      This year, on August 9th from noon to 4 PM, BMC Aggregates is sponsoring an Open House, or Saturday at the Quarry Program at the Fertile Quarry in Fertile, IA. This event will be held in conjunction with the 'Fertile Days,' Celebration sponsored by the Town of Fertile, IA. We will have some activities and rock hunting for the kids[we will have piles of rocks and oversized gravels in the stockpile area for this purpose] and rotating bus trips to the Sand Plant area and to the Working face of the Quarry.

      Driving Directions:
      Fertile Quarry & Sand - 3446 Fir Avenue Fertile, IA 50434
      Directions to Fertile Quarry:
      The Fertile Quarry is just west of Iowa Interstate I-35 and south of Hwy 9 as you are heading west toward Forest City on Hwy 9. Please plan accordingly because from Cedar Falls, IA it takes about an hour and 50 minutes to, two hours travel time.

      1. From I-35 (North or South Bound)
      2. Take exit 203 for IA-9 West toward Manly/Forest City/Hanlontown
      3. Turn at IA-9 & go west toward Hanlontown and Forest City (go west approx. 2.1 miles)
      4. Turn left at Fir Ave. and go South approx. 1.4 miles, and the Quarry will be on your right.

      For more information, contact Glen Rocca (2nd VP BHGMS): info@bhgmsrockclub.org

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


      Rockin Rocks and Fossils!
      Date: August 9, 2013
      Time: 11:00 AM
      Contact: Judy Joyce (319)-330-3833
      Location: Conklin Quarry, Iowa City
      Like rocks? Like fossils? If so this is the TAKO event for you. TAKO (Take A Kid Outdoors) has teamed up with River Products and the Cedar Valley Rock & Mineral Society to have our first Rocking Rocks and Fossil Event. Adults gather your kids, come collect some rocks and fossils with us.
      We will have experts on site to help with identification, so if you have some rocks, minerals or fossils you would like identified, feel free to bring them to the event. Be prepared walk on an uneven surface and explore the quarry. TAKO will be hosting the event Saturday, August 9th at the Conklin Quarry in Iowa City.
      To get there go north on 1st Avenue north of Interstate 80 (Exit 242) and take the first right to the River Products parking lot. Participants must wear closed toe shoes (i.e. boots or tennis shoes) – NO Sandals or flipflops are allowed in the quarry. Participants should dress to get wet possibly muddy Dress in layers and be prepared for a range of weather conditions. Bring a hat, work gloves, sunglasses, sunscreen, insect repellant, drinking water, and any other items you may need to be comfortable in the outdoors. Participants are encouraged to bring a digital camera and/or binoculars.
      Lunch will be served at 11:30 AM. This event is FREE and OPEN to the public. Advance registration is requested, but not required. Questions about the event can be directed to TAKO President, Judy Joyce at (319)-330-3833 or by e-mail at earthview01@gmail.com.
      Advance registration is requested, but not required for families. Those bringing six or more people should register to help TAKO plan equipment and food needs.
      TAKO is a 501-C3 non-profit organization founded in 2006. TAKO is dedicated to providing immersive outdoor experiences, activities, and education to children and people of all ages in the great outdoors.
      Note: TAKO is TAKE a kid outdoors, not LEAVE a kid outdoors. Children must be accompanied by an Adult. Typically, there is no charge for TAKO events. We welcome partners and sponsors. To receive email announcements of TAKO events, send an email message to news- subscribe@takeakidoutdoors.org. Please "like us" on FACEBOOK and watch for updates/cancellations.
      Stay tuned to the website/ Facebook for updates and cancellations.
      For more information about TAKO, visit: www.takeakidoutdoors.org

      Click here for a pdf event flier



      Below is a message requesting volunteers from CVRMS & MAPS President Marv Houg:
      This coming Saturday August 9th is an open house being put on by River Products, TAKO (Take a Kid Outdoors), and the Cedar Valley Rock and Mineral Society. We have been asked to help with the event by pairing up with children and parents to assist them with any questions they may have during their time in the quarry. The ideal situation would be to have about 4 kids and their parents for each club member.
      As of today I have 4 members signed up (including myself). This is very poor representation for an organization that prides itself in promoting our hobby to the public and especially the kids. Also keep in mind that River Products has been very gracious about letting us into their quarries for many many years. If we want to continue to have field trips in their quarries, now is the time to repay that generosity.
      Our members from the Waterloo Club would normally be very helpful on this type of activity, but they are tied up helping with an open house for the quarry at Fertile, Iowa on the same day (see above event). Thus we need more local people to step up and help.
      This event is for our club members also so if you have kids you would like to bring please feel free to bring them along. River Products would like to know about how kids and parents plan to attend so they can make sure they have enough food. AGAIN, WE NEED YOUR HELP. If you can help please let me know via email at m_houg@yahoo.com
      Thanks
      Marvin Houg, President
      Cedar Valley Rocks and Minerals Society
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


      September 2014:


      Annual 2-Day Auction September 20-21, 2014
      From the Cedar Valley Rocks & Minerals website:

      Amana RV Park, 39 38th Ave., Amana, IA
      Sat. from 9 a.m. to about 8 p.m. Dinner available about 5:30.
      Sun. from 10 a.m. to about 4:00 p.m.
      Viewing Fri. from 5:00-7:30 p.m.; Sat. starting at 7:30 a.m.; Sun. starting at 8:30 a.m.
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


      Expo 2014

      Sharpless Auctions Facility, Iowa City, IA



      MAPS Digest - Detailed Expo information


      MAPS Expo Flyer


      The MAPS EXPO Show will be held April 4-6, 2014, at the Sharpless Auction facility just north of I-80 at Exit 249. The Pre-Show will occupy the Travelodge south of I-80 at Exit 246 on North Dodge Street about 3 mi from Sharpless Auctions. Both venues are located in Iowa City, Iowa.


      EVENT: Mid-America Paleontology Society (MAPS) 36th Annual Fossil Expo - the largest fossil-only show in the world. Dealers/Exhibitors from across the U.S & beyond.
      DATES: April 4-6, 2014.
      PLACE: All events take place at Sharpless Auction Building, Exit 249, I-80, East of Iowa City, Iowa
      TIME: Friday and Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday (limited dealers on Sunday) 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
      ADMISSION: The show and all events are free and open to the public, however donations are accepted. Children must be supervised.
      SPECIAL EXHIBITS: Juvenile T-Rex Skeleton (Compliments of Michael & Barbara Sincak - Treasures of the Earth)
      Geologist Michael Sincak and his wife and business partner Barbara have traveled the world in search of the finest specimens and have made exacting casts of famous one-of-a-kind fossils from the classic museums of Europe, Asia, and the United States. The Sincaks own and operate Treasures of the Earth Ltd., near Johnstown, Pa. The company deals in fossils, minerals, architectural pieces, petrified wood, shells, meteorites, statues and carvings from more than 60 countries.
      For further information on the special exhibit - contact: Michael Sincak, Hollsopple, PA, 814-479-7661; treasure@universaltreasure.com

      Expo 36 Show Contact: Tom Williams, Mid-America Paleontology Society - (815) 223-9638; Paleotom234@comcast.net


      EXPO 36 PROGRAM SCHEDULE:

      Friday, April 4


      2:00 p.m. Tom Williams
      'An Overview of Mississippian Crinoids'

      Crinoids were able to take advantage of the extinction that occurred during the Devonian and expand in types of crinoids and numbers of species. Mississippian age crinoid banks are famous from this time period including such sites as Le Grand, Iowa and Crawfordsville, Indiana. Three types of crinoids were present during the Mississippian: Camerates, Inadunates, and Flexibilia. Camerates were the dominant crinoid type prior to the Mississippian. This however, would change during the Mississippian. Inaduantes especially cladids would eventually become the dominate type with camerates decreasing in types and numbers as cladids increased. Inadunates would survive the extinction and would eventually give rise to Articulates.

      Tom Williams is a geology graduate of Western Illinois University and later received a Master of Science in Geohydrology at Illinois State. He has worked for 30 plus years as a geologist for Soil Testing Services Consultants, Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and as a part time instructor at Illinois State in Geologic Environmental Classes. He has contributed articles to several MAPS digests and is currently Show Chairman for EXPO. He has specialised mostly in collecting Crinoids in the Mississippian Chesterian age since 1980, contributing knowledge and some important specimens while collecting with other researchers. In 1998 he worked with Dennis Burdick on a major crinoid dig in the Chesterian of Alabama which uncovered many important specimens including whole plates up to five ft by five feet with some specimens having stems five to six feet long. A fossil trip with Paleoprospectors resulted in finding a thirty foot Tylosaur poriger in the Kansas chalk of Nebraska and a second trip two years ago yielded a Cretaceous fossil flowering plant that may be used for research.
      Contact: Paleotom234@comcast.net


      3:15 p.m. John Catalani:
      'Blastoids'

      Blastoids are an important component of Lower Carboniferous (Mississippian Epoch) faunas. From their origin in the Ordovician to their increase in diversity during the Devonian, Mississippian, and Late Permian, blastoids have provided collectors with exceptional specimens to study. This program will look at blastoid morphology, physiology, and evolution with emphasis on the amazingly diverse and abundant Mississippian genus, Pentremites.

      John Catalani taught high school Earth Science for 32 years before retiring in 2004. From 1995 until it ceased publication in 2011, he authored the 'An Amateur's Perspective' column for the newsletter magazine of the Paleontological Research Institution, American Paleontologist. John has several publications including one on Upper Mississippi Valley nautiloids and several with Robert Frey on Platteville Group Nautiloids. He has also presented many programs to clubs and at Paleofest at the Burpee Museum in 2010.
      Contact: fossilnautiloid@aol.com; 630-852-8747

      Expo 36 Keynote Address

      5:15 pm. Forest Gahn - Brigham Young University - Idaho
      Mississippian: The Age of Crinoids

      The Mississippian Period (359-318 million years ago) was named for rocks exposed along the Upper Mississippi River Valley. During this time, warm shallow seas covered much of North America. These tropical waters were full of marine organisms, especially crinoids, which are also known as sea lilies. Crinoids, animals related to sea stars and urchins, have been present in Earth's oceans for about 500 million years, and they still live today. However, they reached their zenith of diversity and abundance during the Mississippian. With an emphasis on the Midwest, this presentation will address important historical figures in the history of Mississippian crinoid collecting. Moreover, it will explain why the Mississippian became 'The Age of Crinoids' and how crinoid faunas changed throughout this period.

      Forest Gahn was born in Burlington, Iowa, where he began collecting crinoids in high school. After receiving a PhD in geology at the University of Michigan, he spent nearly three years as a research fellow at the the Smithsonian before accepting a position as a geology professor at Brigham Young University – Idaho. Although Forest is particularly fond of Mississippian crinoids, he has worked on echinoderms of many ages, including living species.
      Contact: gahnf@byui.edu; Tel: (208) 496-7677


      Saturday, April 5:

      9:30 a.m. John Moffitt:
      'Paleo-Geography'

      John will present our extensive knowledge of Earth's paleo-geography during its last 3 galactic revolutions, during which time our planet circled the Sun over 600 million times and extensive matter is constantly swapped back and forth from the surface to the interior. This presentation is fast and visual so fasten your seat belt for a wild ride.

      John Moffitt is both an Astrophysicist and Earth Scientist, working in the oil business for 50 years. He’s been a geologist, geophysicist, paleontologist and exploration manager ... and currently supports engineering projects. John is a past president of the Houston Gem and Mineral Society, a past Federation vice-president and has led paleontological field trips around the world. A trilobite collector, he’s been a member of MAPS for 40 years, and has articles in both all-trilobite special issues. He's found in Tucson every year for 35 years and is a veteran of all Trilobite Jams. A past director for Toastmasters, he lectures, cartoons and writes frequently in the Earth Sciences, and was inducted into the National Rockhound & Lapidary Hall of Fame in 2002 for his work in paleontology and with children on Earth Science education.
      Contact: jmoffitt.hou@gmail.com 713-478-4555;


      10:45 a.m. Al Scheer
      'Maquoketa Formation Trilobites - Upper Ordovician Richmondian Fauna of the Upper Mississippi River Valley'

      The year 2013 signified the 100th year anniversary of the publication of Arthur Slocom's paper:Trilobites from the Maquoketa Beds of Fayette County, Iowa. To celebrate this centennial we will look at: 1) the men involved in bringing this paper to publication, 2) the rock Formation that yields this interesting fauna and finally 3) the trilobites from the Maquoketa beds of northeast Iowa and southeast Minnesota as we know them today.

      Al Scheer began to specialise in the collecting of Trilobites during the 1980s and restricted it even further during the early 1990s by concentrating on North American Ordovician trilobites. To fend off the bill collector and put food on the table he had the opportunity to take his educational experiences in the upper Midwest and West Texas into the oil and gas industry for 10 years before the oil crash occurred forcing him back to school to flesh out his ground water education. Today he works in the water resources industry. The enjoyment that he finds through collecting trilobites is not restricted to a single aspect but can be grouped around the following:
      1) being out on the rocks - just as he discovered back in 1974 he continues to really like being in the field looking for specimens, taking note of the taphonomy, trying to deduce the environment of deposition and making sense of the sequence stratigraphy.
      2) There's nothing like the exhilaration that comes from finding that complete bug or part that may be new to the science or adds to the basic knowledge base.
      3) The research that one can carry out whether on the rocks or in the library is rewarding for him and hopefully beneficial to the trilobite community.
      4) Finally, that trilobite community is really a small group and whether we're communicating through internet discussions or meeting at conferences and shows, the unique group of individuals that comes together gives us opportunity to share our knowledge, our experiences, our collections and our comradeship.
      Contact: Ascheer@davyinc.com


      12:45 p.m. Don Johnson
      'Beast Foot! Predatory Dinosaurs Large and Small'

      Get introduced to a variety of meat-eating dinosaurs includingVelociraptor, Allosaurus, andT. rex! See and touch genuine dinosaur fossils including teeth, claws, and bones! How did raptor dinosaurs use their sickle claw to kill prey? Did some dinosaurs hunt in packs? Was T. rex a predator or a scavenger? What's it like hunting for dinosaur bones out West? Bring your own questions to be answered about these ancient beasts.

      Don Johnson is an amateur paleontologist from Iowa City, Iowa with a special interest in fossil vertebrates. His collection of fossils and fossil replicas is one of the largest in Iowa, and he has experience collecting fossils in Iowa and other states out West. Using his self-given nickname "The Fossil Guy," he has taught numerous programs since 2002, mostly at the University of Iowa Museum of Natural History and the Cedar Rapids Science Station. In 2005, Don founded (and is currently President of) the Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project (EIPP) in order to establish exhibits and promote science education through the wonder of paleontology using the motto "Bringing DINOSAURS to Iowa!". To learn more about the EIPP, please visit www.paleoproject.org.
      Contact: 319-213-1390 or donaldjohnson@southslope.net


      2:00 p.m. Charles Newsom
      'Stump the Experts- Bring your fossils to ID'

      If I can't identify it, I will find someone who can. I will also give general tips in IDing your material.

      Charles Newsom is an Emeritus Faculty in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Iowa. He is also a Research Fellow with the Texas Memorial Museum, an avid fossil collector and is currently living in central Texas. He is board member of the Miller Springs Alliance, a non-profit organization which administers the Miller Springs Nature Center and is also collaborating with several paleontologists on a number of paleontological studies.
      Contact: Charles-newsom@uiowa.edu


      3:15 p.m. Tiffany Adrain
      'The Ethics of Fossil Collecting'

      Can you pick up a fossil from just anywhere and keep it? Should you pick it up and keep it? Find out about the legal and ethical aspects of fossil hunting and help keep collecting enjoyable for all.

      Tiffany Adrain is the Collections Manager of the University of Iowa Paleontology Repository where she looks after more than one million fossils from all over the world.
      Contact: tiffany-adrain@uiowa.edu 319-335-1822


      5:15 p.m.
      Live Auction

      Approximately 80 fossils and fossil-related items will be auctioned. Special Auction Item: Dinosaur Dig Trip, offered by Paleo Prospectors, to South Dakota, Wyoming or North Dakota for the summer of 2015. Minimum bid has yet to be determined Keep almost everything you find (up to $4000). Pick from three week-long sessions in June or July. More information on the trip can be found at http://www.paleoprospectors.com.
      Proxy bids may be emailed to EXPO chair Tom Williams: paleotom234@comcast.net.
      Proceeds from the auction are used to support paleontology scholarships.


      Sunday, April 6:

      1:00 p.m. Bill Desmarais
      'Track'em down and Dig'em up'

      Alberta, Canada is a known hot bed of dinosaur discoveries and fossils. Come on this virtual expedition and find thousands of dinosaur tracks and trackways uncovered in a large coal mine in the Canadian Rockies. The expedition continues with discoveries of multiple Albertosaurus skeletons in the badlands of the Red Deer River that hint at the pack hunting nature of large tyrannosaurs. There will be interactive parts where you will be able to apply your paleontologist skills and observe real dinosaur fossils and footprints. Children are welcome and will receive a small sample of real dinosaur bone.

      Bill Desmarais is a retired high school earth and environmental science teacher from Cedar Rapids. Since 1982 he has been fortunate enough to work with Dr. Phil Currie of the Royal Tyrell Museum of Paleontology and the University of Alberta at Edmonton as well as Pete and Neil Larson of the Black Hills Institute of Geologic Research. During this time he has worked at Cretaceous and Jurassic dig sites in South Dakota, Wyoming and Alberta, Canada. The adventure and thrill of discovering dinosaur remains is what drives him to hunt the "terrible lizards". Contact: Desmarais_3@msn.com


      OTHER ACTIVITIES:

    • Silent Auctions Friday and Saturday.
    • Children's Fossil Dig Box.
      MAPS is a non-profit organization of amateurs and professionals from across the U.S. and several other countries whose love of fossils brings them together. The purposes of the organization are to promote popular interest in the subject of paleontology and to encourage the proper collecting, studying, and preparation and displaying of fossils, and to assist other individuals, groups, and institutions interested in the various aspects of paleontology. For more information about the EXPO or our club please visit our web site at www.midamericapaleo.org.

      MAPS Club Meeting, Saturday

      March 1st, 2014

      CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER


      CANCELLED

      In Room #125 Trowbridge Hall

      University of Iowa Campus, Iowa City, IA

      Old man winter has not been kind to the midwest this year, and despite the calendar flipping over to March, he's apparently not done with us yet! Due to yet another Winter Weather Advisory, the March 1st meeting has been cancelled!

      Hopefully the weather improves in time for all the spring rock club shows in the coming weeks!
      Cedar Valley Rocks & Minerals on March 15-16, 2014
      Cedar Valley Rocks and Minerals Society
      our own MAPS Expo on April 4-6, 2014
      and the Blackhawk Gem & Mineral Society on April 27, 2014. Blackhawk Gem & Mineral Society - Contact is Glen Rocca

      MAPS Club Meeting, Saturday

      January 11th, 2014


      Presentation starts at 1:00pm

      In Room #125 Trowbridge Hall

      University of Iowa Campus, Iowa City, IA

      As always, ANYONE is welcome to attend the meeting (you do not need to be a member) and
      ADMISSION IS FREE

      So please, bring a friend and enjoy the talk!
      Drinks & a snack will be provided by MAPS
      UI Campus map



      1:00 PM Program:
      'Dinosaurs on the Rocks':
      New Fossil Discoveries and Insights from the Frozen Continent

      by Josh Mathews - Chief Fossil Preparator and a research assistant to Dr. Bill Hammer at Augustana College.


     For his talks, Josh typically discusses what it's like to do field work in Antarctica, and then gets into the research they are doing.
He will discuss fossils from past expeditions and the new dinosaurs they discovered on their last trip down (2010-11)

Transantarctic Vertebrate Paleontology Project:


     The Transantarctic Vertebrate Paleontology Project involves the collection and study of Triassic to Jurassic age vertebrates from the southern Transantarctic Mountains near the Beardmore and Shackleton Glaciers, Antarctica. Augustana Geology professor William R. Hammer currently the Principal Investigator on a National Science Foundation grant supporting this research, has led eight vertebrate collecting expeditions to these regions since 1977.
     Most recently, Dr. Hammer led an Antarctic expedition in December 2010-January 2011. Included among the taxa discovered is the theropod 22-foot long dinosaur Cryolophosaurus ellioti-- the only one of its kind in the world--on display at Augustana's Fryxell Geology Museum. During the 2010/2011 expedition, the team included Dr. Hammer, Augustana fossil preparator, Josh Matthews and Dr. Nate Smith '02 -- excavation of Cryolophosaurus and Glacialisaurus hammeri (a sauropodomorph long-neck, long-tail dinosaur related to Apatosaurus) was complete and two additional sauropomorph dinosaurs new to science were discovered, one a nearly complete juvenile skeleton. These specimens are currently being described in collaboration with researchers at the Field Museum in Chicago and at Howard University.

The business meeting will follow at approximately 2:00pm
Past News/Events from 2013





MAPS Club Meeting, Saturday

November 9th, 2013


Presentation starts at 1:00pm

In Room #125 Trowbridge Hall

University of Iowa Campus, Iowa City, IA

As always, ANYONE is welcome to attend the meeting (you do not need to be a member) and
ADMISSION IS FREE

So please, bring a friend and enjoy the talk!
Drinks & a snack will be provided by MAPS
UI Campus map


Check back for more info once the talk title(s) is/are posted.

The business meeting will follow at approximately 2:00pm

MAPS Club Meeting, Sunday

October 13th, 2013


Joint fall field trip with the Cedar Valley Rocks & Minerals Society

at River Products Inc Conklin Quarry, Coralville, IA


Conklin Quarry, Coralville, IA - 8:45AM sharp.

Meet at the main entrance to Conklin at 8:45 to sign in and get safety instructions.
Enter the quarry at 9:00.
This is a lock-in quarry; that is, the gate is locked behind us and no one can enter or leave (except in an emergency) until noon, when a group will be let out. Others can come in at that time if they are waiting at the gate.
The rest of the group will leave at about 4:00.
This is a 'hard-rock' working quarry.
Requirements are that you must be a member of the Cedar Valley Rock and Mineral Society or MAPS and sign a waiver.
Also we are going to be enforcing strict safety requirements such as everyone must have a hard hat on, a bright safety vest, and hard shoes (steel toed is preferred). No open toed sandals or tennis shoes will be allowed. Also long pants will be required, no shorts will be allowed. Some type of safety glasses and gloves are encouraged.

All children should be closely supervised.
Possible finds include: millerite, coral heads, horn corals, brachiopods, bryozoans, trilobites, crinoids and maybe cephalopods, fish parts, and blastoids. Useful tools include: rock hammers, cold chisels, sledges and pry bars.
Bring your own water and lunch.
You MUST be a member of CVRMS or MAPS to attend this field trip but you can join at the gate. To save time, download and fill out the club liability waiver at
www.cedarvalleyrockclub.org
Travel to I-80 in Iowa City/Coralville. The quarry entrance is just north of I-80 at exit #242 (1st Ave), across the street from the Hampton Inn parking lot. Contact Marv Houg with questions: m_houg@yahoo.com
Safety first! Please stay at least as far away from highwalls/ledges by as many feet as the wall or dropoff is high - that is, 25 feet away (minimum) from a 25 foot highwall or 25 foot dropoff.

River Products Inc Conklin Quarry, Coralville, IA:


Above is a view of the Middle Devonian strata exposed in the west wall of the River Products Inc Conklin Quarry. Unit contacts are approximate.



SUNDAY AT THE QUARRY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


11 AM-4PM at Basic Material Corporation's RAYMOND QUARRY

EAST OF RAYMOND IOWA ON OLD HY 20,(6900 DUBUQUE RD).

ROCK, MINERAL, FOSSIL COLLECTING, QUARRY FIELD TRIPS; PROGRAMS BY THE GEOLOGICAL SURVEYS, IOWATER, UNI EARTH SCIENCE DEPT., SOIL AND WATER DISTRICT, CITY OF WATERLOO, BLACK HAWK GEM AND MINERAL CLUB, AND MUCH MORE!
Fun, Information, great way to spend an afternoon; it's FREE and a great experience for all ages.
Individuals, School Groups, Scout Groups, and Groups of all ages-something for everyone!
A great way to start Earth Science Week!
Sunday at the Quarry info


This is a large community outreach event involving our sister club, the Black Hawk Gem & Mineral Society(BHGMS).
They are in need of volunteers to help staff the event - see below:

At previous Sunday at the Quarry Events, BHGMS has helped with setup and takedown; parking;
guiding and loading people on the bus trips into the quarry;
assisted adults and children in collecting rocks, minerals and fossils from the rock/boulder piles;
handing out hard hats, safety glasses and rock hammers and monitoring all participants for safely collecting on the boulder pile;
assisted down in the quarry guiding people and keeping them away from the walls as well as a number of other tasks.
This is going to be a big event this year and we need lots of volunteers.
As a bonus, some of the Tri-State Conference attendees will also be attending the Sunday at the Quarry Open House.
The gate will open between 8 & 9 a.m. for setup and be open to the public from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Even if it is only for an hour, Please reply back with a time you can help support this event and the company that
graciously allows our rock club access to their quarries, as well as the great educational opportunity for the public.
To volunteer or for more info, contact Glen Rocca (2nd VP BHGMS)


TRI-STATE Field Conference Saturday, October 5th, 2013
Aspects of the Paleozoic History of Epeiric Seas of the Iowa Basin

Please fill out & mail in your registration!
2013 Tri-State Information & Registration Packet
Special $40 price for MAPS members

The 2013 GLS-SEPM Field Conference will be held jointly with the 72nd TRI-STATE field conference.
The Field Conference will focus on current developments in the understanding of the stratigraphy and factors -
processes controlling epeiric carbonate platform development in the middle Paleozoic epeiric seas of the Iowa Basin.
The conference trip stops will highlight current understanding of the origins and history of Silurian and Devonian
epeiric carbonate platforms at local and basinal scales. The trip will be headquartered in the Cedar Falls area of
north-central Iowa, with the Clarion Hotel on University Avenue in Cedar Falls, Iowa, serving as the conference hotel.

Pick Up of Registration Materials and Pre-Meeting Mixer Friday October 4th
Pick up of trip materials by pre-registered participants and on-site registration will take place in the lobby and bar of
conference hotel (Clarion Cedar Falls, 5826 University Avenue, Cedar Falls, IA 50613, (319) 277-2230, clarioncedarfalls.com)
beginning at 4:00 PM Friday October 4th, through 9:00 PM. A pre-meeting mixer with a cash- bar will take place just behind
the registration area from 7:00 to 9:00 PM.
Conference Hotel: Clarion Cedar Falls, 5826 University Avenue, Cedar Falls, IA 50613, (319) 277-2230, clarioncedarfalls.com.
We have negotiated a conference rate of $89 per room for 21 rooms at the conference hotel, so if you want to book
your room at the Clarion, make sure you are registering as a participant of the TRI-STATE-GLS-SEPM Field Conference.

Mixer and Poster Session: Registration fees will be waived for up to 6 students willing to present posters highlighting
current student research in the areas of sedimentary geology, Quaternary Geology, and paleontology.
Students wishing to present posters must pre-register and provide the GLS-SEPM vice president with your poster topic
no later than Friday September 6th.

PRELIMINARY SCHEDULE
Registration and Check In: Conference Hotel lobby-bar area from 4:00-9:00 PM, Friday October 4th.
Field Conference: Motor Coaches/Buses leave conference hotel parking lot at 8:00AM, Return at 6:00 PM Saturday October 5th.
Mixer (cash bar) and Poster Session from 6:00-7:30 PM in Conference Hotel bar area.
Conference Stops: A list of Field Conference Stops and Itinerary will be finalized and included in the Second Announcement flier.

Post-Conference Earth Week Activities: Sunday at the Quarry, Sunday October 6th sponsored by Basic Materials Company,
at their Raymond Quarry in Raymond, Iowa, just east of Waterloo exiting from eastbound U.S. Highway 20.
Note to all participants: The main conference trip stops will be in quarries in north-central Iowa.
Trip participants should all have hard hats, boots, and eye protection to enter Field Conference quarry stops.
The ISU Geology Club can provide hard hats for individuals that do not have protective head gear.

Field Conference Coordinator: Dr. Jed Day, GLS-SEPM, Department of Geography-Geology, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, Phone: 309.438.8678, Fax: 309.438.5310, jeday@ilstu.edu
Guidebook Editors: Drs. Ray Anderson and Lynette Seigley, Iowa Geological Survey
Jed Day, Treasurer GLS-SEPM, Department of Geography-Geology, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61790-4400
For further information, contact Jed Day Treasurer GLS-SEPM at jeday@ilstu.edu

Expo 2012 Door Prize Photos



Adult Prizes


Kid's Prizes



MAPS Club Meeting, Saturday

January 12th, 2013


Presentation starts at 1:00pm

In Room #125 Trowbridge Hall

University of Iowa Campus, Iowa City, IA

As always, ANYONE is welcome to attend the meeting (you do not need to be a member) and
ADMISSION IS FREE

So please, bring a friend and enjoy the talk!
Drinks & a snack will be provided by MAPS
UI Campus map

Tooth found during excavations - picture from the UIMNH website


The program will be given by Sarah Horgen - the Education & Outreach Coordinator at the University of Iowa Museum of Natural History, and is titled
'The Mahaska County Mammoth Site: Excavation, Research, and Outreach':

Researchers at the University of Iowa are currently overseeing the excavation and associated research of two mammoths in rural Mahaska County, Iowa. Bones were first uncovered at the site in 2010 by the landowner, who approached the University of Iowa in early 2012 to request assistance in further excavation when it became clear that there were many more bones located at the site. Since April of this year, the UI Museum of Natural History has been coordinating the excavation and research efforts at the site, with many UI departments collaborating on the project and many participants from schools and groups across Iowa. UI researchers will present on the importance of this discovery and what the associated research may tell us about Iowa during the Ice Age, as well as the educational and outreach impact of this project for Iowans.



The business meeting will follow at approximately 2:00pm

MAPS Club Meeting, Saturday

February 9th, 2013


Presentation starts at 1:00pm

In Room #125 Trowbridge Hall

University of Iowa Campus, Iowa City, IA

As always, ANYONE is welcome to attend the meeting (you do not need to be a member) and
ADMISSION IS FREE

So please, bring a friend and enjoy the talk!
Drinks & a snack will be provided by MAPS
UI Campus map

Following the tradition of the past few years, short programs will be given by UI Graduate Students that are in part being supported by MAPS scholarships - these scholarships are funded by our silent & live auctions at the annual Expo gathering in the spring.
Check back for more info once the talk title(s) is/are posted.

The business meeting will follow at approximately 2:00pm

Joint MAPS-CVRMS Field Trip Sunday,

October 14th, 2012


Conklin Quarry, Coralville, IA - 8:45AM sharp.

Meet at the main entrance to Conklin at 8:45 to sign in and get safety instructions.
Enter the quarry at 9:00.
This is a lock-in quarry; that is, the gate is locked behind us and no one can enter or leave (except in an emergency) until noon, when a group will be let out. Others can come in at that time if they are waiting at the gate.
The rest of the group will leave at about 4:00.
This is a 'hard-rock' working quarry. All field trippers should have the appropriate safety equipment, such as hard hat, eye protection and steel-toed or other sturdy shoes. All children should be closely supervised.
Possible finds include: millerite, coral heads, horn corals, brachiopods, bryozoans, trilobites, crinoids and maybe cephalopods, fish parts, and blastoids. Useful tools include: rock hammers, cold chisels, sledges and pry bars.
Bring your own water and lunch.
You must be a member of CVRMS or MAPS to attend this field trip but you can join at the gate. To save time, download and fill out the club liability waiver at
www.cedarvalleyrockclub.org
Travel to I-80 in Iowa City/Coralville. The quarry entrance is just north of I-80 at exit #242 (1st Ave), across the street from the Hampton Inn parking lot. Contact Marv Houg with questions: m_houg@yahoo.com
Safety first! Please stay at least as far away from highwalls/ledges by as many feet as the wall or dropoff is high - that is, 25 feet away (minimum) from a 25 foot highwall or 25 foot dropoff.

River Products Inc Conklin Quarry, Coralville, IA:


Above is a view of the Middle Devonian strata exposed in the west wall of the River Products Inc Conklin Quarry. Unit contacts are approximate.





Regular MAPS Meeting was held on Saturday,

November 12th, 2011


Meeting held in Room 125 of Trowbridge Hall on the University of Iowa campus.
UI Campus map

The Nov meeting featured a program by MAPS member Phil Burgess. Phil has discovered a unique fossil bearing layer in the normally unfossiliferous rocks of the Lower Ordovician Prairie Du Chien Group. The rocks of the Prairie Du Chien Group were deposited in a very shallow & warm epicontinental sea, with restricted water circulation leading to generally hypersaline conditions. These conditions were too harsh for most organisms, and algal stromatolites are often the most common fossils noted in the Prairie Du Chien.
Phil has found a layer in the Prairie Du Chien where conditions were more normal marine for a short period of time, and has found a wonderful fossil fauna from that interval.
For more background geology on the area, check on the Geological Society of Iowa web site


This specimen of the nautiloid cephalopod Oneotoceras is from the layer Phil Burgess discovered in the Prairie Du Chien Group.

MAPS Member Phil Burgess found this slab of snails & cephalopods in Lower Ordovician age rocks of the Prairie Du Chien Group!

National Fossil Expo 33

event itinerary:

April 1-3, 2011

in Western Hall on the campus of

Western Illinois University


Friday, April 1st:

     Expo show floor open 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.

     Door prize sign up all day.

     Keynote Address at 5:15 P.M. - Dr. Steven Niklas: "Application of Archaeological Field Methods in Paleontology"


Saturday, April 2nd:

     Expo show floor open 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.

     Silent Auctions all day.

     Door prize sign up all day.

     9:30 A.M. - Workshop talk: Don Johnson: "When Tyrannosaurs Roamed Montana"

     10:45 A.M. - Workshop talk: Bill Desmarais: "Jurassic Jumble: Waugh Quarry, Wyoming"

     12:45 P.M. - Workshop talk: John Catalani: "Ammonites: End of an Era"

     2:00 P.M. - Workshop talk: Charles Newsom: "Stump the Experts - Bring your fossils in to ID"

     3:15 P.M. - Workshop talk: Tiffany Adrain: "Who Will Look After my Fossil Collection"

     5:15 P.M. - Live Auction!

Sunday, April 3rd:

     Expo show floor open 8:00 A.M. to Noon - Limited Vendors

     Door prize drawings!

For more info visit the Expo 33 Page


Come & see "Ice Age Park" at Expo 33!!

     Each year at Expo, Michael and Barbara Sincak of Treasures of the Earth set up a huge display, and Expo 33 will be no different. In fact, their display promises to be bigger and better than ever! Michael has put together a set of displays he likes to call "Ice Age Park"! He has been kind enough to provide us with some photos of these displays - for a preview of what will be at Expo 33, SEE BELOW!


This Saber Toothed Cat display will be part of "Ice Age Park" at Expo 33!

This Stegodon will be on display at Expo 33!

Another view of the Stegdon - at the Tuscon, AZ show!

Come and see this Woolly Rhino at Expo 33!

Come see the Giant Sloth at Expo 33!

Thanks to Michael & Barbara Sincak and Treasures of the Earth!

2011 EXPO table registration form


Expo 33 Informational Flier





Regular MAPS Meeting February 12th, 2011
at 1:00 P.M.

     The meeting will be held in Room 125, Trowbridge Hall on the University of Iowa Campus.
UI Campus map

     The keynote speaker will start at 1:00 P.M., and be followed by a question & answer session and then the regular club business meeting.
     This is a chance to see one of the students that MAPS is helping to sponsor via money raised by the Live Auction at Expo!

"The Evolution, Diversity, and Biogeographic Distribution of Ornithischian Dinosaurs"

     Will be presented by Marc Spencer, a PHD candidate under Dr. Chris Brochu in the UI Department of Geoscience. Marc is a vertebrate paleontologist interested in the evolution, systematics, and historical biogeography of ornithischian dinosaurs and other subclades within Archosauria. His work involves the evaluation of statistical methods for phylogeny estimation, character evolution, and biogeographical reconstruction. Marc holds a B.S. (2002) in Geological Sciences from Binghamton University and an M.S. (2007) in Geology from Bowling Green State University.

January 8, 2011 MAPS Keynote Recording


Click on the appropriate link below to view a recording of the talk

'Geologic Secrets of Illinois' Fossil Rain Forest.'

as presented by Scott D. Elrick of the Illinois Geological Survey
.

     Elrick will describe the discovery and ongoing exploration of a 300-million-year-old fossilized forest, found near Danville, Illinois. Photographs of these beautifully preserved and somewhat bizarre plants, many of which are now extinct, will be showcased during the presentation. Fossil specimens will be available for viewing.

     This ancient forest is the world's largest intact rain forest from the Pennsylvanian Period ever to be discovered. At just under 10 square miles, the forest's sheer size offers an unprecedented view of ancient forest life and diversity. This rare find, discovered in the roof of an underground coal mine, opens a tantalizing window into the past. The forest plants and their encapsulating geology reveal much about the ancient environmental conditions during the time of their formation and about the coal they left behind. Elrick will describe the geology surrounding this amazing underground discovery and the tectonic and climatic factors that led to the remarkable preservation of this fossil forest.

     Recognized as one of the top 100 science stories of 2007 by Discover Magazine, the fossil forest story has already attracted the attention of the Smithsonian, Weather Channel, and Discovery Channel, among others.

     Scott Elrick was born and reared in Champaign, Illinois. He received his B.S. degree in geology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his M.S. in geology from the University of California, Riverside. He has been a geologist in the Coal Section at the Illinois State Geological Survey for 9 years. His current studies include the stratigraphy, sedimentation, and climate of the Pennsylvanian.

You may need the QuickTime Player plug-in to view the movies. You can download it here -
Free Apple Quicktime download

     Pre-emptive webmaster comment: Allow me to apologize ahead of time for the low quality of the recording - my camcorder is itself a fossil, and definitely not hi-def by any stretch of the imagination. However, low-res is better than no-res. I spent the first few minutes of Scott's talk fighting with my camcorder's balky buttons & disjointed menu system, so my apologies as the recording picks up as his talk was already in progress.

Also, hi-speed internet is highly recommended to download or view these, as the files are very large.

Click here to view a smaller (205 MB) Movie File - .mpeg4 type.
This file should work with iTunes if you have that installed on your computer. This would be the one to choose if you plan to view the movie on an iPod or smartphone or if you have a slower internet connection.

QuickTime and the QuickTime Logo are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.


Expo 32 Show Summary



This fabulous slab of Eocene fossils was for sale at Expo!


     This giant trilobite reconstruction was offered at the Live Auction.


This Tsintaosaurus was set up by Michael Sincak's business: Treasures of the Earth.


     Many thanks to all the folks who helped improve turnout at Expo 32: MAPS club members, Expo Vendors, and other friends of the club - you know who you are and how much all of your efforts helped the show!
     Special thanks must be made to Michael Sincak of
Treasures of the Earth , who sets up a large display each year at Expo, in addition to that this year he had 50 large signs made up and saw to it that they were put up all over Macomb to help interested folks find their way to the show.
     Other folks undertook e-blast campaigns, some made & printed up information posters, and still others did such things as make sure local media outlets received copies of the Expo 32 news release. This led to Expo 32 being prominently featured in a couple of Illinois newspapers, which definitely had a positive effect on turnout. The feedback we recieved via the door prize slips indicated that it was not one single method of publicity that dominated - it was the combination of many different sources: traditional media, web sites, e-mail, signage around town, word of mouth through schools, scouts, and so forth.
     Please note that we will undertake a similar show promotion effort for Expo 33 in 2011, taking what was learned this year and hopefully building upon it. We will need anyone who is willing to volunteer to help out doing some of the things listed above and more. If you are interested please contact one of the webmasters and we will get you in touch with the proper people.
     Thanks to everyone who made suggestions for improving next year's Expo! Anyone who has additional suggestions on how we might promote/advertise the show, please feel free to pass along your ideas to us!


Q & A session after Bill Desmarais' Expo workshop!


     John Catalani prepares to give his Expo workshop talk.


The Fossil Guy's EIPP display table.

     One thing in particular that proved to be very popular with show attendees were the various workshop talks (see pics above and below) , given by Don "the Fossil Guy" Johnson, Bill Desmarais, John Catalani, Charles Newsom, and Tiffany Adrain. Thanks to all the speakers! Each talk was attended by a minimum of 50 people or so. The talks were followed by a question & answer session, with lots of hands on displays and/or interaction with the speaker. Charles' "Stump the Experts" fossil ID workshop started early and ran late, as so many folks were lined up with specimens to identify. Tiffany's Q&A for her Cataloging Collections workshop ran very long due do so many good questions coming from the audience. All in all, considering this was a sort of trial run for these workshops, they really went over quite well. We hope to get many if not all of the speakers back again next year if they are willing!


Tiffany Adrain's Cataloging Collections workshop.


     Expo attendees line up to try and 'stump the expert' with their various specimens.


Don 'the Fossil Guy' Johnson talks about 'Laura the Kid Dinosaur' during his presentation at Expo 32.



The Blackhawk Gem & Mineral Society's Annual

Gem, Mineral, & Fossil Show will be held

Sunday, April 17th, 2011 - from Noon to 5pm.


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The show will be held at the Waterloo Center for the Arts, 225 Commercial St. Waterloo, Iowa 50701.

Admission is FREE!
The theme for 2011 is 'Geodes: Iowa's Rolling Stones' - but there is much more to see & do!


The show will feature Richard Kline: "Using Optical Techniques for Today's Lapidary Arts", as well as the University of Northern Iowa Museum.
It will also feature a couple of workshop talks by Jim Preslicka: "Update on the Independence, IA Fossil Cephalopod Fauna" and "Devonian Fossil Gorge: Deja vu All Over Again".

The show will also include the following:
  • Free polished stones for children
  • Black light show
  • hobby demonstrations
  • silent auction
  • special displays
  • dealers
  • Fossil plaster casting
  • Silversmithing
  • agates
  • Rock Tumbling
  • Sphere making
  • Antique Marbles
  • Faceting
  • Crystals
  • Geodes
  • Fossils
  • Hand crafted Jewelry
  • Gems
  • Fish pond
  • Minerals
  • Flint Knapping
  • Tumbled Stones
  • Children's Pebble Pit

Show Flier           Press Release

Show contact info:

Show Chairman: Dave Malm - 319-266-6433 - email

Blackhawk Club Vice President: Glen Rocca - 319-885-6737 - email


The Cedar Valley Rocks & Minerals Society's Annual

Gem, Mineral, & Fossil Show will be held

Sat & Sun March 19 & 20, 2011.

Please note that the show will be held at a new location this year -
Hawkeye Downs Expo Center
4400 6th Street SW
Cedar Rapids, Iowa


The 2011 Show Theme is
"Treasure's From Iowa's Ice Age" featuring Ice Age Fossils and Lake Superior Agates.

Show hours will be 8:30 am to 5 pm Saturday, March 19th
and 9:30 am to 6 pm Sunday, March 20th.


Show info:      Flier      News Release      CVRMS web site

Show Contacts:      Marv Houg 319-364-2868      Sharon Sonnleitner 319-396-4016      Tom Whitlach 319-362-0684     


You will be able to see "Ice Age Park", a set of 4 skeleton displays featuring a Stegodon, Saber Tooth Cat, Woolly Rhino, and a Giant Sloth; all courtesy of Michael & Barbara Sincak's Treasures of the Earth!



Doug DeRosear had these Mississippian echinoids for sale at the 2010 show!

Demonstrations will include:
  • Tumbling
  • Faceting
  • Glass Bead Making
  • Cabbing
  • Beading
  • Sliversmithing
  • Flint Knapping
  • Geode Cracking



Marv Houg's Iowa Fossils display from the 2010 show!

There will also be silent auctions and plenty of kid friendly activities, including a fossil pit, pebble pit, and a dino dig sand pit.






This T-Rex was at the 2010 show!



There will be numerous displays set up, including:
  • Stegodon
  • Ground Sloth
  • Saber Tooth Cat
  • Woolly Rhino
  • Agates
  • Fossils
  • Minerals
  • Amethyst
  • Gold
  • Petrified Wood
  • Polished Stones
  • Artifacts
  • Spheres
  • Geodes





Kids search for fossils at the UI Repository Fossil Pit!

Expo 33 information page



News Summaries From Earlier in 2010

2010 fall GSI Field Trip:
"The geology of Klein and Conklin Quarries,
Johnson County, Iowa"
9:00 A.M. Saturday, October 9th, 2010.

Above is a view of the Middle Devonian strata exposed in the west wall of the River Products Inc Conklin Quarry. Unit contacts are approximate.


This trip is a jointly sponsored event by MAPS, the
Geological Society of Iowa, and the Cedar Valley Rocks & Minerals Society.

Just in from GSI: This trip is free and open to anyone in the interested public! Also, after the field trip ends, there will be a pizza dinner (at approximately 5pm) at The Mill Restaurant in downtown Iowa City, the cost for this dinner is $6.00, but you need to pre-register to attend the banquet. After the dinner, Dr. Ben Greenstein will speak on his extensive in depth research on coral reefs and their response to global climate change.
Dr. Greenstein has been the keynote speaker at many MAPS meetings, and his talks are most imformative.

Members of the GSI club ($10 per year cost) get a free copy of the GSI Field Trip Guidebook, but non-members can also order print copies (prices listed on GSI web site) or download free PDF copies of the Guidebooks from the GSI website. These Guidebooks are extremely useful references on the geology of the trip sites, and are good to have on hand in your library or on your hard drive!

The field trip will begin at River Products Inc Klein Quarry in Coralville, Iowa at 9:00 A.M. on the 9th of October. Please keep in mind that this trip is on a Saturday as opposed to our usual Sunday excursions. The quarry will be operating as normal for a Saturday, so it is very important that trip participants DO NOT DRIVE ON THE OFFICE SCALE and also LEAVE A LANE FOR TRUCKS TO PASS WITHOUT CROSSING THE SCALES!

General format for GSI Field Trips is to have a short lecture on various aspects of the geology of the locality being visited. This is a good chance to pick up information on the local geology-paleontology-minerals you could see & collect there. Then there is a chance to search for and collect fossils & minerals that the sites contain. This is a great chance to learn some geology and also to meet & make new friends and contacts - especially considering that 3 clubs are involved on this year's trip!
From the GSI Sept. 2010 Newsletter: "(Klein) Highlights include glacial striations as well as whalebacks in Devonian limestone, spruce logs hundreds of thousands to nearly 2 million years old, logs from ancient trees over 300 million years old, Pennsylvanian channels in Devonian limestone, spectacular fossils of Devonian crinoids & trilobites, and large calcite crystals.
The Conklin succession includes the upper part of the Devonian Wapsipinicon Group and parts of the Little Cedar and Coralville Formations of the Cedar Valley Group as well as Lower and possibly Middle Pennsylvanian channel and karst fills. Furthermore, one of the thickest, most complete sections of Pre-Illinoian Quaternary deposits in the Midwest had been exposed at Conklin. Fossils include the branching stromatoporoid Idiostroma and the colonial coral Hexagonaria. Conklin Quarry is famous to mineral collectors for its deposits of millerite."

  • Line up at the entrance gate by 8:45 am to sign the needed waiver forms & permission slips.
  • We will enter the quarry at 9 am.
  • You can save some time by downloading the field trip waiver, printing & filling it out, and then bringing it with you on Saturday.
  • Klein is a working quarry owned by River Products, Inc of Iowa.
  • It is necessary to bring safety equipment such as a hardhat, protective shoes, safety glasses, etc.
  • The rocks exposed in the quarry are very hard Devonian limestones, so you will need rock breaking and/or cutting tools if you have them.
  • Also please note- THIS IS A LOCK IN QUARRY once inside, you are not able to leave until the group exits. So, please bring a lunch, plenty to drink, and probably some sunscreen.

Please note that while time to collect will be given at each quarry, the period allotted may be as short as an hour, depending on how long the presentations at each quarry go.
There will be another MAPS-Cedar Valley Rocks & Minerals Society field trip to Klein Quarry the day after the GSI trip: Sunday, October 10th.
The Oct. 10th trip will allow for much more collecting time for interested folks.
Please note that to attend the Sunday Oct 10th trip, you must be a member of either MAPS or CVRMS in good standing.
However, you can join up and/or pay dues at the gate on Sunday morning!


A specimen of the Oncocerid nautiloid genus Acleistoceras sp. from Klein Quarry. Found by MAPS/BHGMS/CVRMS member Glen Rocca.

A coiled nautiloid cephalopod, belonging to the same family as the modern day Nautilus Pompilius. Found by MAPS/BHGMS/CVRMS member Glen Rocca at Conklin Quarry.

A trilobite (Phacops rana norwoodensis) from the Lower Rapid Member of the Little Cedar Formation at Conklin Quarry. Found by MAPS/BHGMS/CVRMS member Mike Powelka.



Field Trip to River Products Klein Quarry
8:45 A.M. Sunday, October 10th, 2010.

Above is a view of the main pit at Klein Quarry, taken from the upper bench on the west side of the quarry.


  • This is a joint trip between MAPS and the Cedar Valley Rock & Minerals Society
  • You must be a member of MAPS or CVRMS in good standing to enter the quarry.
  • You can join up & pay dues on site.
  • Line up at the entrance gate by 8:45 am to sign the needed waiver forms & permission slips.
  • We will enter the quarry at 9 am.
  • You can save some time by downloading the field trip waiver, printing & filling it out, and then bringing it with you on Sunday.
  • Klein is a working quarry owned by River Products, Inc of Iowa.
  • It is necessary to bring safety equipment such as a hardhat, protective shoes, safety glasses, etc.
  • The rocks exposed in the quarry are very hard Devonian limestones, so you will need rock breaking and/or cutting tools if you have them.
  • Also please note- THIS IS A LOCK IN QUARRY once inside, you are not able to leave until either noon or 4pm. So, please bring a lunch, plenty to drink, and probably some sunscreen.

The rocks exposed at Klein are of the Middle Devonian (Givetian Stage) Lower Cedar Valley Group - Little Cedar Formation: Solon & Rapid Members; & Coralville Formation: Cou Falls & Iowa City Members. There are also outliers of the State Quarry Member of the Lithograph City Formation of the Cedar Valley Group;
there is also a lateral equivalent to the lower Juniper Hill Shale Member of the Lime Creek Formation; as well as a Pennsylvanian age river channel fill. (These last 2 are exposed on the uppermost benches and may be difficult to access.)
Some of these strata contain abundant fossils:
primarily corals & brachiopods; but bivalves, snails, cephalopods, echinoderms, trilobites & fish bones/teeth sometimes will turn up.

Scroll down this page to see some pictures from previous Klein Quarry trips.


The Blackhawk Gem & Mineral Society's Annual

Gem, Mineral, & Fossil Show was held

Sunday, April 25th, 2010.


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The show was held at the Waterloo Center for the Arts, 225 Commercial St. Waterloo, Iowa 50701. The theme was 'The Lapidary Arts: Cut & Polished Nature's Beauty Revealed' - but there was much more to see & do!

Show Flier

Show contact info:

Show Chairman: Dave Malm - 319-266-6433

Blackhawk Club Vice President: Glen Rocca - 319-885-6737



University of Iowa Museum of Natural History

announces spring series of 'Fossil Guy' presentations!

April 3, 10, & 17!!

Don't miss the next series of programs by 'Fossil Guy' Don Johnson at the UIMNH on the following Saturday afternoons at 2:00pm.
Programs are 30-minute talks with audience participation followed by 30-minutes of hands-on interaction and question & answer time.
Mapquest map showing location of MacBride Hall

The summaries below are only partial ones - be sure to visit the Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project's Events web page for full details on this latest lecture series!


Saturday, April 3:
'Beast Foot! Predatory Dinosaurs Large and Small'

Get introduced to a variety of meat-eating dinosaurs during this educational program! What were the first dinosaurs like? When and where did other carnivorous dinosaurs live? What caused some meat-eating dinosaurs to become some of the largest predators to walk the earth, while others remained as small as a chicken? How did the raptor dinosaurs use their sickle or 'killing' claw on each foot to kill their prey? What can we learn about dinosaur hunting behavior from the fossil evidence? Did some dinosaurs hunt in packs? The answers to these and many other questions can be heard at this talk! See all sorts of cool displays as well!
Visit EIPP's web site for more details!


Saturday, April 10:
'Exposing Ancient Anatomy: A Look Inside Prehistoric Beasts'

What can we discover about the anatomy of extinct creatures from fossil evidence including bones, footprints, eggs, skin impressions, coprolites and stomach stones? How can we use the anatomy of modern animals to learn more about prehistoric beasts? See detailed models of Tyrannosaurus rex, Velociraptor, Triceratops, the 3-toed horse Mesohippus, the woolly mammoth, and the giant extinct shark Megalodon that show possible reconstructions of their skeletons, muscles, skin, and even internal organs! All these topics and many more will be discussed!
Visit EIPP's web site for more details!





Saturday, April 17:
'The World of Laura the Duck-billed Dinosaur'

See and touch fossil bones of 'Laura the Kid Dinosaur' and learn about the world in which she lived! Laura was a young Hypacrosaurus, a type of crested duck-billed dinosaur that lived 75 million years ago in Montana. Learn about what makes Hypacrosaurus special including how it chewed its food, how it grew, and how it cared for its young. Fossils, replicas and models of duckbills and other dinosaurs that lived with Laura including tyrannosaurs, horn-faced dinosaurs, raptor dinosaurs, armored dinosaurs, and ostrich-mimic dinosaurs will be on display. Much more will be discussed at this presentation!
Visit EIPP's web site for more details!

Don's talks are kid friendly and he always brings lots of really cool hands on displays, so plan on bringing the whole family along!
MAPS will be partnering with UIMNH on one of Don's talks on November 13th of this year!

The Cedar Valley Rocks & Minerals Society's Annual

Gem, Mineral, & Fossil Show was held

Sat & Sun March 20 & 21, 2010.

The show was held at the Teamster's Union Hall, 5000 J Street SW, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. It included an array of programs on Dinosaurs and other aspects of the theme.



All sorts of goodies could be seen at the show!

Demonstrations included:
  • Tumbling
  • Faceting
  • Glass Bead Making
  • Cabbing
  • Beading
  • Sliversmithing
  • Flint Knapping
  • Geode Cracking



A little something for everyone!

There were also silent auctions and plenty of kid friendly activities, including a fossil pit, pebble pit, and a dino dig sand pit.







Michael Sincak's 33' Tsintaosaurus display!

There were numerous displays set up, including:
  • T-Rex Skull
  • Agates
  • Fossils
  • Minerals
  • Amethyst
  • Gold
  • Petrified Wood
  • Polished Stones
  • Artifacts
  • Spheres
  • Geodes





First Crack Geodes had these on display in the '08 show!

Burpee Museum Paleofest 2010

Paleofest was held Saturday, March 6th and Sunday, March 7th, 2010
.
Famous dinosaur paleontologist Dr. Phil Currie and paleobotanist Eva Koppelhus headlined the speakers there this year, along with many others.

For more info, visit Burpee Museum's website.

From the Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project website:

These youngsters had something to claw about at Paleofest in 2008!

EIPP sponsors at Paleofest in 2006.

An Allosaurus goes 'head to head' with an EIPP sponsor at Paleofest in 2006.


Thanks to all who helped the Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project

bring 'Laura the Kid Dinosaur' back to life!

•  Laura was a juvenile Hypacrosaurus stebingeri, a crested duck-billed dinosaur, and she lived during the Late Cretaceous Period, about 75 million years ago.

•  Laura's fossilized bones were discovered in July 2004 on private land north of Dupuyer, Montana in the Two Medicine Formation. David Wolf and crew of Two Girls Fossils in Houston excavated her bones during the 2004 and 2005 dig seasons.

•  The recovered skeleton is over 90% complete, with a skull that is about 50% complete. This makes Laura's fossil skeleton one of the most complete of all dinosaur skeletons!

•  Laura's fossil skeleton was brought to Eastern Iowa by the EIPP sponsors. Laura may have been a male or female dinosaur. She is named after EIPP President Don Johnson's daughter.

•  Laura will be 11' long and 5' high at the hips when mounted, would have been about 4 years old and weighed about 750 lbs. when alive, and had only a hint of the plate-shaped head crest of the adults.

•  Laura's species is only one of a handful of dinosaur species that are known from eggs, nests, embryos, hatchlings, and all stages of development to adulthood.

     The EIPP is partnering with Cycad Productions Ltd. (CPL) of Watermill, New York, to bring 'Laura the Kid Dinosaur' back to life! Roby Braun, CPL President, will be sculpting a 1:4 scale detailed life restoration of Laura using measurements from her fossil skeleton. Roby has over 30 years' experience developing exhibits featuring full-scale ancient life restorations worldwide! Roby is donating $7,000 of this $8,000 project in the form of research, design, sculpting, molding and casting fees as well as some material costs. He will also keep a journal of sketches and photographs of this project and make it available to the EIPP. The EIPP will use this journal and the Laura life restoration for educational purposes and to promote our future dinosaur exhibit. Roby and his company will become EIPP Sponsors in the 'Lifetime Donor' category. Now we are merely awaiting completion of the reconstruction by Cycad Productions! Thanks to all who participated in this effort!

     MAPS decided to support this project at our meeting in December of '09, and will be listed as a donor with Laura's traveling display! To keep tabs on this incredible educational opportunity, please check out EIPP's website, or you can contact EIPP's President (who also is a member of MAPS!), Don Johnson.

Don will be at Expo 32 this year, so stop in and see some of the EIPP's wonderful displays!



Saturday, February 13, 2010

Two roughly half-hour talks followed by in depth Q&A sessions were given by UI Geoscience grad students:

'Morphological variation in Lystrosaurus', by PhD candidate Jessica Camp;

Lystrosaurus was a pig sized 'mammal-like reptile' that lived around 250 million years ago, in the Late Permian and Early Triassic Periods.

and 'Phylogenetics of the Early Ordovician pliomerid trilobites
Protopliomerella, Pseudocybele, and related taxa: Unravelling the base of the cheiruroidean radiation'

by MS candidate Neo Buenger-McAdams.

This specimen of a Ceraurus trilobite fossil (pic from Wikipedia Commons) is from Ordovician rocks and was found in Mississippi.

UI campus map

Trowbridge Hall is just off of Market Street (a one way going down the hill towards the river), and the IMU Parking Ramp which is adjacent to Trowbridge can be accessed off of Madison Street.



Saturday, January 9, 2010

'Paleontological evidence for rapid fluctuation in the global sea level'

was presented by Dr. Ben Greenstein - Professor and Geology Dept. Chair at Cornell College.

Location: The Norton Geology Center on the Cornell College campus in Mt. Vernon, Iowa on Saturday, January 9th, 2010, at 1PM.

Dr. Greenstein's bio on the Cornell website

Above - Dr. Greenstein near Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia

Old man winter did not force a cancellation of the January meeting this year, and Dr. Greenstein gave a very interesting talk on Jan 9th, focusing on his research regarding the last interglacial sea level highstand which occurred approximately 130,000 years ago. This was the last time in Earth's history that sea level was higher than it is currently. Dr. Greenstein's talk was a particularly timely topic, considering the current concerns with increasing rises in mean sea level as Earth's climate warms due to man-made greenhouse gas emissions. Dr. Greenstein was gracious enough to allow MAPS to record his talk, and once there is time to edit & upload some or all of the talk, links for those interested in seeing some or all of the talk will be posted here.

News Summaries From

Earlier in 2009

Saturday, November 14, 2009

UI Repository Curator Tiffany Adrain presented a talk from 1-2pm titled:

'We don't just put numbers on fossils! Recent projects in the UI Paleontology Repository.'

at the regular MAPS club meeting which was held in room #125 Trowbridge Hall on the University of Iowa Campus in Iowa City.

The UI Paleontology Repository is home to over 1 million fossils from all over the world, and all geologic ages. While we spend a lot of our time cataloguing and organizing the collection (only another 880 thousand to go!), we are also involved in research, teaching and outreach. One of our goals is to develop new ways of allowing everyone to access and use our collection. Recent projects include on-line access to specimen records and images for researchers, a 'Tropical America Virtual Field School' for students, an interactive website on Iowa fossils for the public, and a new website about the Iowans who have helped build our fossil collection for everyone interested in the history of fossil collecting and the contributions of fossil enthusiasts towards paleontology research.

Tiffany Adrain, Collections Manager, gave a short talk about these projects, followed by a tour of the collection.

Above - Tiffany Adrain receives the 2008 Don Good Award at MAPS Expo 30.

To view a partial UI campus map click here.

Trowbridge Hall is just off of Market Street (a one way going down the hill towards the river), and the IMU Parking Ramp which is adjacent to Trowbridge can be accessed off of Madison Street.


Conklin Quarry Field Trip from October 25th, 2009

The club held a well attended fall field trip, and many cool fossil & mineral specimens were discovered by club members.

Photo content from the trip will be uploaded in the coming weeks as time permits.

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE FIELD TRIPS PAGE, and see some of the things you might find at Conklin!


The 1st Annual Fossil Fest of Iowa - 'Fossil Treasures from the Age of Dinosaurs'

was held Saturday, October 24th, 2009

at Cedar Rapids Washington High School.

The 1st Annual Fossil Fest of Iowa was a success, with approximately 330+ people attending the event on what turned out to be one of the few nice weather days in all of October 2009. Folks were able to learn from area amateur paleontologists speaking about dinosaurs, giant ground sloths and other Iowa fossils during talks at 10am, 11am, 1pm and 2pm. At 3pm, Mike Henderson from the Burpee Museum in Rockford, IL gave his keynote talk titled 'Jurassic Jackpots: Burpee Museum's Dinosaur Discoveries from Montana & Utah.'

Ideas are being floated around and very early planning is already underway for the 2nd edition of Fossil Fest in 2010, so please bookmark the PaleoProject's website so you can keep up to date on developments: www.paleoproject.org

People were able to see full-size replicas of a T. rex skull and Allosaurus skull!

Folks were able to touch fossil bones of 'Laura, the Kid Dinosaur' and enjoy other fossil displays, including many fossils from Iowa!

FOSSIL FEST TALK SUMMARIES

10:00am TALK:'Dinosaur Predator! Dinosaur Prey!' by Don Johnson - A.K.A. The Fossil Guy

11:00am TALK:'Devonian Fossil Gorge - Deja vu all over again' by Jim Preslicka

12:00pm LUNCH BREAK

1:00pm TALK:'Tarkio Valley Sloth Project' by Dave Brenzel

2:00pm TALK:'Track'em Down and Dig'em Up - Dinosaur Discoveries in Alberta' by Bill Desmarais

3:00pm KEYNOTE SPEAKER:'Jurassic Jackpot' by Mike Henderson (on the right in adjacent photo)

Theodore Roosevelt National Park

To download a PDF file of the Fossil Fest flier click here

The 1st Annual Fossil Fest was sponsored by the Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project, the Connections Natural History Speaker Series, the Cedar Valley Rocks & Minerals Society, the Mid-America Paleontology Society, the Science Station, and the University of Iowa Museum of Natural History.


April 3-5, 2009:

Was the National Fossil Expo XXXI at Western Hall on the campus of the University of Western Illinois in Macomb, Illinois.

Above left - Stegodon, a giant ice age relative of elephants, greeted folks attending Expo 31.

Above right - Aren't you glad Charcharodon megalodon sharks are extinct?

Dr. William I Ausich of the Ohio State University gave a very informative talk titled "These are not the Crinoids your Granddaddy knew". He covered topics from the evolutionary origins of crionoids, three distinct evolutionary groups of crinoid communities, and also the beginnings of his research into possible organic molecule preservation in fossil crinoid specimens. It will be most interesting to see what the results of this research turn out to be in the coming years. Dr. Ausich also covered the coming Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology crinoid volume revision, which will be a monumental undertaking.

Dr. Ausich then patiently took questions following his talk, answering each and every one posed to him. Dr. Ausich is also in need of some crinoid material for his organic molecule research. Several club members volunteered some of their collections - he basically needs stem material to crush up and process to search for possible organic molecules that have been protected by the calcite. The specimens will of course be destroyed by this process, but if you might have some stem material with stratigraphic control (time period, formation, etc) you are urged to contact Dr Ausich through Ohio State University.

A MAPS board meeting was held on Friday the 3rd, and it was decided to change the name of the President's Award to the Sharon Sonnleitner award, in honor of Sharon's 20 years of invaluable service to MAPS as its Tresurer. Many thanks to Sharon for her years of dedication to the club, and also for her help in the transition to the new Treasurer - I can say with certainty the new guy would be totally lost without her!

A MAPS business meeting was also held on Saturday the 4th, where members discussed in polite but resolute tones the need to do more advertising/publicity for Expo in the future. In general it was agreed that the club needs to do more to raise public awareness about the show, and to increase attendance at future shows. A committee was set up to oversee Expo publicity, and a number of ideas were touched on. More emphasis will be placed on signage around Macomb, as well as reaching out to local media outlets via TV and Radio. It will take a concerted effort by the club as a whole to pull this off. Several members volunteered to hand out Expo fliers in their local areas and at other rock shows and so forth. Any member who might like to help in this fashion is urged to contact the web master (see the link on the home page near the bottom right).

Dr. Paula M Mikkelsen of the Paleontological Research Institution awarded the 2009 Katherine Palmer award to Richard E Petit during a short presentation prior to Saturday night's keynote by Dr. Ausich. The award presentation was recorded and will be available shortly on the PRI website, http://www.priweb.org .

Expo show chair Thomas Williams also announced that the focus for next year's Expo will be the Cincinnatian Stage of the Upper Ordovician. A speaker will be confirmed in the near future.

Above is a panoramic view of the MAPS Expo 31 show floor.


February 14:

Above left - speaker Bill Hickerson shows MAPS members his trilobite collection.

Above right - some of Mr. Hickerson's trilobites (yes, he had MANY more!).

Bill Hickerson gave a very interesting presentation on the Trilobites of the Cedar Valley Group to the club on Feb 14 at Trowbridge Hall in Iowa City. His talk included an informative slide show, with general geologic information about the local Devonian rocks, as well as about some Devonian trilobite groups. He then gave a pretty detailed discussion of some of the 32 species(!) of trilobite known from the Lower Cedar Valley Group, in the Little Cedar and Coralville Formations. Rocks from these 2 Formations should be familiar to many club members, as these are exposed at Klein and Conklin quarries, which are frequent MAPS collecting trip destinations. Many of the trilobite specimens collected by MAPS members on these trips come from the Lower Rapid Member of the Little Cedar Formation.

Bill discussed naming problems with some of the Cedar Valley genera and species, demonstrating for the club just how much work remains to be done in this area. He also covered the evolution of a few species of the well known genus Phacops in the Little Cedar Formation. Phacops iowensis is the oldest, and has 13 rows of eye facets in its compound eyes. It is replaced by P. norwoodensis which has 15 rows of eye facets. This species is in turn succeeded by P. rana with 16 or 17 rows of eye facets. This is a good example of evolution, which can be described as "change through time with cumulative modification". There must have been some selective process at work in the Phacops lineage during Cedar Valley time which favored those animals with more rows of eye facets. Did this change allow the animal to see predators earlier? Perhaps to find a mate more easily? Or maybe to find food more quickly? It is interesting to ponder.

One other point of discussion in Bill's talk was the major trilobite extinction which occurs just above the Coralville Formation. Many formerly abundant trilobite genera and species go extinct in North America at this geologic horizon, and yet similar trilobites were still common in other parts of the world at the same time. He went over several potential causes of this extinction, but none can be definitively pointed to as the cause as of yet.

After the talk a good time was had by all looking (perhaps drooling would be a better word here!) over the trilobite collection that Bill brought with him, as well as examining the Paleocene leaf collection brought in by club members Doug DeRosear and Karl Stuekerjuergen.

Click here to view more pictures taken at the club meeting .

(The business meeting took place prior to Bill's talk from 1-2 pm. In general, many of the items covered were related to the upcoming MAPS Fossil Expo XXXI the first weekend in April.)

Above left - an enrolled specimen of the trilobite Phacops rana norwoodensis from the Rapid Member of the Little Cedar Formation.

Above right - a slab of Phacopid trilobites from the Solon Member of the Little Cedar Formation.


January:

Old man winter was unkind to us and forced first the postponement and then the cancellation of the January MAPS meeting which was to take place at Cornell on January 17th.

April 3-5, 2009:

Was the National Fossil Expo XXXI in Western Hall on the campus of the University of Western Illinois in Macomb, Illinois.

Click here for a Map showing Western Hall

The focus this year is on crinoids and the keynote address will be given at 7pm Friday, April 3rd by Professor William I. Ausich of Ohio State University.

There will also be a regular MAPS business meeting on Saturday, April 4th at 6pm, followed by the annual awards presentations and then the Live Auction at 7pm!

Expo show hours are 8am - 5pm Friday and Saturday, and 8am - noon on Sunday. ADMISSION IS FREE!

Please click here for a printable EXPO table registration form.

April 4-6, 2008

EXPO XXX at Western Illinois University in Macomb, Illinois

FREE ADMISSION to the World's Largest Fossil Exhibition!
Membership is not required for your participation, except for table rental.

Full information will be available by mid-January.

BUY, SELL, SWAP & DISPLAY OF FOSSILS EXCLUSIVELY

Western Hall
Western Illinois University
Macomb, Illinois

February 2008

The February MAPS(Mid-America Paleontology Society) meeting will be held in Room 125 of Trowbridge Hall at the University of Iowa on February 10. The regular business meeting will run from 1-2 p.m. followed by a program by Bill Hickerson on the fossils of the Cedar Valley Formation. (Bill is familiar to many of you for his work on the Silurian soft-bodied fauna from Eastern Iowa)

January 2008

The January MAPS (Mid-America Paleontology Society) meeting will be held in Room 125 of Trowbridge Hall at the University of Iowa on January 12. The regular business meeting will run from 1:00-2:00 p.m. followed by a program by Brian Witzke of the Iowa DNR on the Pennsylvanian material in the Klein Quarry (Devonian bedrock)in Coralville

Of possible interest to those of you in the Iowa/Illinois/Missouri area:

PUBLIC AUCTION Glen & Mary Hanning Estate Rocks - Fossils - Gems - Minerals For further information, contact Janice Bryant at 217-322-4096.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007 AT 10:00 A.M.

Auction to be conducted at the Lowderman Auction Facility, located 2 1/2 miles west of Macomb, IL on Highway 136.

All the information for this sale is located on this website: http://www.lowderman.com/sales/11.24.07hanning/catalog.html

November 2007

The November MAPS (Mid-America Paleontology Society) meeting will be held in Room 125 of Trowbridge Hall at the University of Iowa on November 10. The regular business meeting will run from 1:00-2:00 p.m. followed by a program by James Preslicka on the spectacular fossils(ammonoids, cephalopods, etc.) coming out of an eastern Iowa Devonian quarry this summer. Local collectors are being encouraged to bring some of their better specimens to the meeting for a show and tell.

October 2007

The October MAPS (Mid-America Paleontology Society) meeting was held in conjunction with the fall field trip at Klein Quarry in Coralville Iowa on October 14.

March 2007

EXPO XXIX

March 30,31 & April 1 at Western Illinois University in Macomb, Illinois Theme: Dinosaurs. Friday night's Keynote Speaker: Pete Larson
Chair: Steve Holley Co-Chair: Gil Norris

See the Expo 29 page for more information.

February 10, 2007

February MAPS(Mid-America Paleontology Society) meeting

Special Presentation:
The Middle Ordivician Winneshiek Lagerstatte from the St. Peter Sandstone in northeast Iowa

Location: Room 125 of Trowbridge Hall at the University of Iowa.

The regular business meeting will run from 1-2 p.m. followed by a program presented by Paul Liu and Bob McKay (research geologists from the Iowa Geological Survey) entitled "The Middle Ordivician Winneshiek Lagerstatte from the St. Peter Sandstone in northeast Iowa." This is one of the most significant fossil finds in Iowa history (from a paleontological perspective). Don't miss it!

January 20, 2007

January MAPS (Mid-America Paleontology Society) meeting

Special Presentation:
The Coral Reefs in Western Australia & The Wreck of the Batavia

Location: The Norton Geology Center on the Cornell College campus in Mt. Vernon, Iowa on January 20.

The regular business meeting will run from 1-2 p.m. followed by a program presented by Dr. Ben Greenstein - Professor and Geology Dept. Chair at Cornell. He has new data from his work on the coral reefs in Western Australia - as well as a story of the wreck of the Batavia which occurred on one of the islands where he worked. It is a story of murder, mutiny, intrique, survival and heroism - all integrated with fossils! Please note that this is at Cornell rather than at the University of Iowa. Speaker Link

Directions:

http://cornellcollege.edu/tours_maps/maps/static_map.shtml

The Norton Geology Bldg is basically on the corner of First St. W and Fifth Ave. S

Mapquest gives a route turning left off of Hiway 1 on 2nd St SW and proceding to Fifth Ave.  I would go a block further north on Hiway 1 to the stoplight (First St - which is the main street east and west thru town) - then turn west and proceed to Fifth Avenue. There is a small parking lot to the north of the Geology Bldg where we park.Then you have to walk up the hill to go in the front door on the south side of the building . The meeting room is right inside - the first door to the right.

From: N Dodge St & I 80 Iowa City, IA 52240 US
To: 5th Ave Sw & 1st St Nw Mount Vernon, IA 52314 US

1. Start out going NORTH on IA-1 N/N DODGE ST toward IA-1 S. Continue to follow IA-1 N. (18.44 miles)
2. Turn LEFT onto 2ND ST SW. (0.26 miles)
3. Turn RIGHT onto 5TH AVE S. (0.07 miles)
4. End at 5th Ave Sw & 1st St Nw Mount Vernon, IA 52314 US

Total Estimated Time: 24 minutes
Total Distance: 18.77 miles

November 11, 2006 (Saturday)

The meeting will be held in Room 125 of Trowbridge Hall at the University of Iowa on Saturday November 11. The regular business meeting will run from 1:30-2:30 p.m. followed by a program on "The progress of the sloth dig in Western Iowa" presented by Sarah Horgen, Education and Outreach Coordinator from the Museum of Natural History. There is a scheduled dig the weekend before so the program will be an up-to-date report. We have been invited to go across the street to the museum to see their sloth exhibit after the meeting. Please note that the meeting starts a half hour later than normal. Sloth Dig Link

October 15, 2006 (Sunday)

The meeting was held in conjunction with the fall field trip at Klein Quarry in Coralville Iowa on October 15.